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  1. friendly_meese

    friendly_meese Member

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    "Please read back issues before submitting"

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by friendly_meese, Jun 30, 2014.

    I got a rejection email that boiled down to "Please read back issues before submitting." Except I _had_ read some back issues of that publication--at the library. So what they really meant is that their customer database didn't show me paying them money for back issues or getting a subscription directly from them. Which seems to mean that their whole submission process is a scam intended to increase circulation rather than offer writers a chance to submit work for publication.

    The evil, repulsive monsters that are obsessed with money control everything and keep the rest of us under their thumb. I'm sick and tired of everything on earth being just a scam to get money out of me.
     
  2. criticalsexualmass

    criticalsexualmass Active Member

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    Were the back issues recent? Was your submission related to the subject matter/social issues/quality/genre that you encountered in those back issues? Normally this type of rejection means you have submitted something outside the bounds of what that publication typically produces
     
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  3. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Contributing Member Contributor

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    This would be my take on it. Quite a number of publications I've looked at for submissions even state in their guidelines that one should read their recent back issues to get a feel for the types of stories they're looking for. I doubt any reputable publications only publish stories from their subscribers.
     
  4. Cogito

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Exactamundo.
     
  5. GingerCoffee

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    Much as I usually see marketing schemes everywhere, I'm with @Cogito and @criticalsexualmass on this one. Regardless of what you read, it may be a standard rejection letter instructing authors to match submissions to the kind of submissions they are seeking.
     
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  6. TWErvin2

    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    As GingerCoffee indicated, there is a strong likelihood that it is a form letter rejection.

    Most publishers (novel and short story) use them. Sometimes they'll add a personal note/line to the content, but usually not.
     
  7. A.M.P.

    A.M.P. People Buy My Books for the Bio Photo Contributor

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    I'll chime in with a different notion; did you check whether those back issues matched the kind of work you did? It goes far beyond simple genre checks like horror or fantasy. Some are more into character growth, philosophy, action, or whatever else. There's genres within genres they might be interested in and yours simply didn't have that element.

    IE: Publisher A wants horror and so does Publisher B.
    Pub. A wants monsters with claws and tentacles ripping people apart.
    Pub. B wants house invasion situations.
    Both are horrors but with a different sub-genre.
     
  8. Mike Kobernus

    Mike Kobernus Contributing Member

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    It might be the case that he was off the mark regarding the style of his piece. But he is quite correct about the possibility of it being an easy scam. Not guaranteed, of course, but is is possible.

    I came across a scam, when I submitted part of my MS to a publisher. They were very positive, and requested seeing the FULL MS, once it had been professionally edited. And, wouldn't you know it, they could even recommend someone for the job. For the smallest time, I was excited. Then I looked into the editor they suggested, and discovered that they were part of the publishing company. Sheesh....
     
  9. Devlin Blake

    Devlin Blake Member

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    Typical Vanity Press operation. They do it to would be Models too. (You need professional pictures...we know a guy...)
     
  10. Devlin Blake

    Devlin Blake Member

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    True. When I write short stories, I write a very specific kind. The markets who like, it love it. The ones that don't are not my market. These magazines might not be your market. And I agree, it's a form letter. Most magazines don't really have resources to see if you're a subscriber.
     

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