1. Viserion

    Viserion Senior Member

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    Post-Apocalyptic Norway Setting Idea

    Discussion in 'Setting Development' started by Viserion, Aug 26, 2020.

    150 years ago, a mysterious experiment went wrong. From that day onwards, whenever someone dies, a nigh-indestructible giant appears to ravage mankind.

    Although humanity was already reduced by warfare before this apocalypse, the sheer numbers forced them to flee. Atop isolated mountains, in the middle of the seas, on the barren plateaus, humanity barely hangs on to life. However, in Norway, a truly safe refuge somehow exists.

    This fertile plain, called Idavoll, is warded by a giant ring of runestones. The Jotnar refuse to cross this boundary, although anything beyond it is fair game.

    The Jotnar are 12-50 foot tall giants with a hunger for livestock and humans. They are nearly indestructible save for their internal weak spot, which varies depending on the individual. They have immense strength, able to shatter stone and effortlessly carve out tunnels if they wished.

    My questions for the setting are as follows:
    What would a primitive (musket era) Norwegian settlement look like from day to day?
    How big should this area be, and what crops/livestock would it have?
    How did seasons affect ancient rural Norwegian settlements?
    What sort of society/governance would this area likely have?
    Why would people brave the wilds at all?
    What would the upper limits of the population be?
     
    Steve Rivers likes this.
  2. Gladiolus83

    Gladiolus83 Contributor Contributor

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    What crops/livestock would it have?
    When it comes to horses I would look at the Norwegian Fjord Horse. Not only does it originate from the area, it is also very versitile and can be used both for farming and for war.


    How did seasons affect ancient rural Norwegian settlements?
    Winter was harsh with lots of deep snow. They had to make sure they had food to last through it all. If hunting or the crops didn’t go well they were in serious trouble. Worst case they had to slaughter animals they had planned on keeping, both to have something to eat and to cut down on the amount of hay and such needed to keep the animals alive. And since they don’t have plumbing they had to melt snow over the fire for water.

    Edit: As far as other livestock goes, I’d say cows, pigs, sheep and goats are to be considered. Just keep in mind that pigs and goats are more difficult to keep in their encloseres. I have never had goats, so I don’t know how they tend to escape, I have just heard they get out easily if you are not careful. But I have had pigs. You can’t have ANY gap in their fence. If they can get their snouts between the planks then they are strong enough to widen it and can get out. That mean you have to bury the lowest parts fence so that they can’t reach it. And depending on how the ground is it varies how deep you have to go. They dig out sandy terrains quite easily and have a harder time in rocky terrains. The best way to keep pigs in are with electric fences, they can feel the currents and don’t go to close. But I’m not sure they still have access to electricity in your story, and very rural places might have trouble getting it too.

    Hope this helps.


    Edit 2: For crops I suggest barley, rye, wheat, oats and potatoes.
    And am I right in thinking Attack On Titan is one of the inspirations for this?
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2020
    Viserion and Steve Rivers like this.
  3. Viserion

    Viserion Senior Member

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    Thanks!

    Yeah, it's a 'giant story' if that makes sense. Of course, the setting is a lot different from AoT.
     
    Gladiolus83 likes this.

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