1. Alex R. Encomienda

    Alex R. Encomienda Contributor Contributor

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    Publishing in non paying markets and anthologies

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by Alex R. Encomienda, Nov 24, 2018.

    I was reading about being published in certain lit mags which led me to this article:
    https://writersinthestormblog.com/2017/06/the-legal-side-of-writing-for-anthologies/

    I don't think it's bad to have your work published in non paying journals or magazines but I have done some double thinking about where I'm submitting to after reading the article.

    What are your thoughts on submitting to lit mags that don't pay?

    What are your thoughts on submitting to editors who don't send a contract with your acceptance letter?

    What are your thoughts on submitting to anthologies in general?
     
  2. TWErvin2

    TWErvin2 Contributor Contributor

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    Unless the story written is so niche that there isn't another option (or the author feels strongly about supporting a certain charity that will benefit from sales), consider submitting works to paying markets first. The better paying markets/anthologies will offer more potential readership, and other benefits to the writer.

    I am more likely to submit a reprint to a market that doesn't pay (anthology or ezine), if they accept them.
     
  3. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

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    There are some great literary magazines and journals that don't pay like A Public Space and Mid-American Review. Others as well. But most of the good ones do pay. That being said, I'm not opposed to submitting to smaller operations run by universities, and many of those don't pay. I do it all the same and it's still really, really hard.

    As far as contracts go, I don't think there is too much to worry about if the outlet has a solid reputation. The places I've sold work to have all sent me contracts and they were pretty straight forward, nothing worth hiring a lawyer to look over. I actually think the contract is more for the publisher. In every case they have waited until the contract is signed and back to them before wasting any time editing or revising my story.

    I've worked for literary journals that don't send out contracts and it never caused a problem. I wouldn't recommend demanding any sort of contract after a story has been accepted. I would be okay working without one. The biggest benefit to a writer in the contract is probably the kill fee, meaning if they don't publish your story in a given amount of time, they will still pay you usually half the amount they would if they ran your story. This is just something that seems to be included in a lot of the contracts I've seen. But we're talking about short stories or poems and not whole books. We're talking about a one-time publication and maybe achieved on a website. Personally, I don't feel like it makes too much of a difference if there is a contract or not. I think it just comes down to how the publication conducts business, but I don't see it making too much of a difference for the writer.

    I don't really have experience with anthologies other than I recently submitted a story to one of them. I feel like you can reach more readers by publishing in journals or magazines than with anthologies unless we are talking about The Pushcart of Best of series, but those aren't places you submit to. The publication has to nominate your story to be included in such.
     
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  4. Alex R. Encomienda

    Alex R. Encomienda Contributor Contributor

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    The part that says "don't ever trust a publisher/editor who doesn't give you a professional contract" bothers me. I don't think contracts are that important because when you get the acceptance letter they say all rights go back to you after it is published.

    And I know what you mean @deadrats .. It's hard enough getting into non paying markets. I can already imagine myself swooshing through lists and lists hoping to find that perfect magazine only to get a cold, hard rejection.
     
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  5. The Dapper Hooligan

    The Dapper Hooligan (V) ( ;,,;) (v) Contributor

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    I would personally always ask for a contract. It's not discourteous, it's just business and a prudent bit of professionalism. If they get sketched about sending a contract, especially if it's not a well known publisher, it could be a good indication that something's hinky.
     
  6. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

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    Story of my life...
     
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  7. X Equestris

    X Equestris Contributor Contributor

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    Like TW said, I'd hit paying markets first if at all possible. I only consider submitting to places that don't pay anything if it's a very short piece or a reprint. That's why, of my published stories, only a piece of microfiction was with a non-paying market. Everything else at the very least had royalties on the table.

    No formal contract might fly with me if they're just buying one time rights to the story for a flat payment or something, but I'd really want it all written up for terms any more complicated than that.

    As for anthologies, roughly half my published stories are with them. I think it's a bit easier to tell what anthologies, especially themed ones, are looking for than it is with magazines.
     
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