Rejection, rejection, rejection...

Discussion in 'Publishing' started by deadrats, Aug 19, 2016.

  1. Dr. Mambo

    Dr. Mambo Contributor Contributor

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    I'm the same. I think it's worth it, to be honest. My 38th draft is always better than the 3rd, though the number of changes I make between drafts 37 and 38 are nowhere near as many as between 2 and 3.
     
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  2. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

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    Rejected by The Paris Review and New Letters. These ones took two or three months.
     
  3. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

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    Just got a 128-day form rejection from Baltimore Review. What else you got for me rejection Gods? Go ahead, give me your best shot. I can take it.
     
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  4. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

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    A few more... a 45-day personal rejection from Boulevard, 104-day rejection from The New Yorker and a long enough wait from The Atlantic to no there is no interest there.
     
  5. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

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    Just wondering, @deadrats . Have you been able to see any patterns, when it comes to what you've sold and what you haven't? In other words, do the 'sold' pieces have some element to them that the (yet) unsold ones don't? I think you've got enough sales under your belt now to maybe make a comparison. Any ideas? Would it be general style? Content? Subject matter?
     
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  6. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

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    If I only knew... Seriously, it turns out being accepted is way more shocking than being rejected. But it would seem there are a few editors out there that feel I have something to say worth printing. I think it's just writing more and getting better and reading the places known for putting out today's best fiction. Then you start to pay more attention to clarity and strong openings and unique characters and unexpected situations. It really is probably a matter of just getting better more than anything else. And to achieve our true potential I think being prolific and dedicated helps us along. I don't want to disclose where my work has been accepted. None of the stories have come out yet, and I'm not sure about posting these sort of details about myself on the forum, but I have shared my good news with a few of you privately and I thank you all for your support and encouragement. I will say this, if I've noticed any sort of trend, it is that all of my accepted stories have been first person and present tense.
     
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  7. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

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    First person and present tense. That's interesting. That's the kind of comparison I meant. Does this influence the way you intend to write in the future at all? Do you feel that's a natural voice for you to use?
     
  8. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

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    I do tend to write a lot in first person present tense. It's kind of like my natural default. I'm writing my novel in first person past tense, but with much the same kind of tone as used in a lot of my short stories if that makes any sense. I seem to do well with the deceptively quiet story.
     
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  9. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

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    It can be a good learning experience to write in a voice and tense that's not your usual one. But I don't know ...I think if you find one you're comfortable with, using it allows other things to flow more freely.

    I always use third person past tense to write fiction. I've tried using first person, but while I can get started fairly well, I can't keep it up. I've never tried writing in present tense in any voice.
     
  10. Krispee

    Krispee Senior Member

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    I think that the details aren`t as important than the headlines, knowing you got accepted is encouragement for the rest of us; that if you keep working hard and keep writing it will work out, in one way or another.
     
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