1. Marcelo

    Marcelo Member

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    So, which language?

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Marcelo, Aug 21, 2008.

    I was born in Mexico, so Spanish is my primary language. Then I learned English, and since then I can say I have progressed quite a lot. In a week (August 25th) I'm going to start my last year in junior high school (In Mexico, high school doesn't starts until 10th grade), and I want to learn a third language. I can't decide though. These are my options:

    1) Italian
    2) German
    3) Irish Gaelic (I know, it's weird but the language enthralls me)

    I think I will find Italian easier to learn since it resembles Spanish, but I like German because it seems you're always cursing xD. And Irish Gaelic... It sounds cool, and my favorite folklore/mythology is the Irish one (the mythology about Cuchalainn and Fir Bolg, you know those guys). Help would be appreciated, and if some one talks any of these languages tell about them :)
     
  2. Shadow Dragon

    Shadow Dragon Contributor Contributor

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    I think Irish Gaelic sounds like a cool language. You should go with that one.
     
  3. Gladiatus

    Gladiatus New Member

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    Italian. It is relatively easy - lots of O's and E's at the end of words. Also the verbs are pretty simple and the adjectives etc resemble english alot.

    I just finished this at GCSE (exams at end of year 11) and got an A so :p
     
  4. Cheeno

    Cheeno Member

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    Go with the Irish :) Ta a lan gra gaeilge agamsa. Is maith liom ag caint e gach la, nuair a b'eidir me. (I absolutely love Irish. I like speaking it every day, when I can.) Imagine the buz you'd get coming to Ireland and shocking the bejayziz out of the natives! An Irish American comedian, Des Bishop, who has lived in Ireland for the last decade or so, spent a year in Ireland's native speaking area (the West) and, once fluent, took his show to the States. What happened? He met a Korean guy on 8th avenue who'd thought himself Irish. I mean, where would you get it?? He also sang 'Jump around' with a gang of rappers he'd met out on the street, with Des singing it 'as gaeilge' (in Irish). Brilliant! So yeah, try the Irish. True, it's not common to countries other than Ireland and Scotland, but it's so beautiful and historic, with familial tenticles spreading throughout the world. Go n'eiri an t'adh leat! (Good luck!)
     
  5. Banzai

    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

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    German is a fun language :) But the grammar can be quite complicated at times. It was certainly my downfall.
     
  6. Still Life

    Still Life Active Member

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    Why not learn all of them?

    I'd say, start with Italian, since you'd pick that up more easily and quickly, and move onto whatever you want next : I'd suggest Gaelic. Sounds fun.
     
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  7. Marcelo

    Marcelo Member

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    Hmmm... Yeah, I can learn all of them but I want to learn them well, so just one at a time. I think I'll start with Italian, because here in Ciudad Obregon there are no Irish Gaelic classes I think :(
    Well, I'll have to learn Irish Gaelic sooner or later because I plan to live in Ireland when I grow up :D
     
  8. Gladiatus

    Gladiatus New Member

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    You could always try some Klingon :p

    Sorry, just a fantasy of mine.........
     
  9. Kit

    Kit Contributor Contributor

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    Lol if I were you i'd go for the Italian :p
     
  10. Delcelia

    Delcelia New Member

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    Oh, Klingon was fun for a while :D. Although I would absolutely absolutely love Irish Gaelic, I would recommend German or Italian - in your case, probably Italian. It's another Romance language so it's related to both of the languages you already speak. As someone who learnt a dead language for 10 years and indulged herself in her fair share of fantasy languages including Quenya (Tolkien's High Elvish)...

    ...dead and uncommon languages have their place, but you really want to be learning something that you can communicate meaningfully to other people in, at the time that you're learning it. Without a motivation to communicate in that language, taking classes in it will get very tedious.

    Is it necessary to learn Irish Gaelic to live in Ireland? I was under the impression that it was mostly spoken as a second language, even by natives of Ireland.
     
  11. Marcelo

    Marcelo Member

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    But it is an official language, I think. Taught in schools and all of that. And I love Irish folklore and how the language sounds, and I would like to communicate with it. I'll be learning Italian first though.
     
  12. alias

    alias New Member

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    German is very hard, i learnt it for 2 years. There are lots of weird modifications you need too make for each gender. Like das die, der etc instead of just the.
    BUT it is a VERY widely spoken language and i would urge you to learn it.
     
  13. Cheeno

    Cheeno Member

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    Technically, Irish is Ireland's official first language, but the reality is that English is the language the country operates under. In Gaelteacht areas (Irish speaking), throughout the West, North, and more sporadically around the East and South, Irish is spoken as a first language. Though it has been taught in the schools here from the foundation of the State (1923), the methodology used meant it remained in the classroom. Now though, Irish is in the midst of a revival nationwide, with the emphasis on the 'spoken word' as apposed to the grammatical side of things. Because of this, it is becoming a 'living' language outside of the established Gaelteacht areas.
     
  14. Bluemouth

    Bluemouth Contributor Contributor

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    Choose a language you're more likely to use.

    Learning Irish is like learning Icelandic. There's not really any reason to because both Ireland and Iceland now speak fluent English throughout.
     
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  15. Cheeno

    Cheeno Member

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    With respect, while English is the predominent language in Ireland, it lacks cultural personality, where-as Irish resonates with a rich and vibrant cultural history. If a person was considering moving to Ireland, I would recommend they at least familiarise themselves with the language so they can fully experience the wonder of true Irishness in all its manifestations.
     
  16. Paki-Writing

    Paki-Writing New Member

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    I know you didn’t list French, but why not? It sounds romantic.

    ***

    I want to learn Spanish, I signed up for it, but I’m scared of it! I was raised in a bilingual home and then spent years learning the Arabic language. Now I’m a trilingual. If I learn Spanish, that’ll make it four! Not sure if I can handle another one.
     
  17. Marcelo

    Marcelo Member

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    I don't have a problem with gender modifications, spanish have them too. el, la, los and las replace the.
     
  18. Rani99

    Rani99 Member

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    Yea, why not listed french? Well, as you speak Spanish I guess Italian would be easy for you to learn. German is cool, I don't find their grammar difficult, but others say it is. And I think pronunciation is not that difficult either. Gaelic Irish probably won't be useful?
     
  19. Wreybies

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Supporter Contributor

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  20. Rani99

    Rani99 Member

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    Hahahah, that made me laugh. This forum is so old?
     
  21. Wreybies

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Yeah, we've been around for a while. ;)
     
  22. matwoolf

    matwoolf Contributor Contributor

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    ...

    I imagined him - fireside, glass held in his hand [crackle]...Across the room, I am perched upon a foot stool...

    'With respect to you, while English is the predominent language in Ireland, it lacks cultural personality.'

    'Ew...'

    'Whereas Irish resonates with a rich and vibrant cultural history.'

    'Eww.'

    'If a person was considering moving to Ireland, I would recommend they at least familiarise themselves with the language so they can fully experience the wonder of true Irishness in all its manifestations... ... ...'

    'Aw, orr, cach, I...fack off.'
     

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