Tags:
  1. frigocc

    frigocc Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Messages:
    754
    Likes Received:
    511

    Switching Genre After First Book?

    Discussion in 'Publisher Discussion' started by frigocc, Mar 2, 2019.

    Basically, first novel is a satirical superhero book It's a reality-based book, where pretty much everything goes wrong.

    No sci-fi or fantasy elements in it at all. But I plan on having the sequel be a satirical sci-fi book, where what he thought was reality kinda got flipped on his head, and he was abducted by aliens to help them blah blah blah. Not really important. Just know that it's satirical and sci-fi.

    Is this frowned upon? Still similar writing style, still satirical, and still the same main character. I want to be traditionally published, but scared that changing genres will scare them off. Third novel will be set in Hell, so that's another genre there.

    Or maybe, the genre is simply satire, and setting doesn't matter.
     
  2. Cave Troll

    Cave Troll Banned Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2015
    Messages:
    17,350
    Likes Received:
    26,175
    Location:
    Where cushions are comfy, and straps hold firm.
    I think it kinda stays within the Satire, with your
    "Series of randomly unfortunate circumstances",
    you seem to put your MC through given the themes
    and concepts you have for each book.
    So I wouldn't say it is switching genre, but more
    of sub-genre, while keeping the same MC throughout.
    So it will always be Satire before it sub category,
    which helps it reach a broader audience that most
    single genre novels don't really try to draw in a
    broader audience, because they write for a single
    niche audience.

    As for the trad-pubb bit, IDK.

    Good luck to you though. :)
     
    Just a cookiemunster and Rzero like this.
  3. Rzero

    Rzero Reluctant voice of his generation Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,226
    Likes Received:
    2,197
    Location:
    Texas
    I agree with @Cave Troll. You're safe. If the satire is a dominant enough element, it should carry us through those shifts just fine.
    Depending on precisely how this dealt with, it's conceivable that some readers might resent the "it was a dream the whole time" aspect of a reveal like that. Though I think that's easily prevented by keeping the mechanics consistent or sprinkling a hint or two here and there that on their own mean nothing, but can be pointed to after the change. "See? This was going on the whole time. You just didn't know it!" I don't know your stories or what exactly the big reveal is. This could all be completely unnecessary. It's worth mentioning though.

    Again depending on factors I don't have, you might consider placing the revelation that reality is not what we thought it was at the end of book one instead of the beginning of book two. The MC wouldn't even have to know if you don't want him to. That could be for the readers only.

    ETA: Satire is a good genre for a smack in the face in the last paragraph anyway.
     
    Cave Troll likes this.
  4. frigocc

    frigocc Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Messages:
    754
    Likes Received:
    511
    I guess I'm scared that making satire out of different things will break rapport. Not just different settings, but different concepts. First book, making satire of super hero tropes. Second book, of rock gods, like Ozzy and Bruce Dickinson.

    It's not necessarily the "everything was a dream" type of thing. Basically, first book is about how, in real life 2019, becoming a superhero isn't realistic. Tons of obstacles to it, no one actually has superpowers, and there's simply not much major crime that takes place. In the second book, it takes place is space, where there's spaceships, aliens, and battles happening (but might make it similar to the first book in that it's not as action-packed as you'd think). It basically goes from keeping with 100% reality in the first book (EVERYTHING hyper-realistic), to sci-fi with ridiculous stuff (like Angus Young actually being an alien named Anus Bum from the planet HDMI, and his spaceship is a guitar powered by a Marshawn amp AI [like Marshall amp], that responds to every question with, "I'm only here so you don't get fried.") But still using a similar structure and style of comedy. I think I can make it work, just not sure traditional publishers will like it.
     
    Rzero likes this.
  5. Rzero

    Rzero Reluctant voice of his generation Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,226
    Likes Received:
    2,197
    Location:
    Texas
    That's the bit where you might consider putting something about the aliens at the tail end of the first book. It's just an idea. I don't know how well it would work for your story in particular, because I haven't read it, but it is an established device that has been successfully deployed in similar situations.

    Sounds like fun stuff. I'd read it.
     
  6. frigocc

    frigocc Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Messages:
    754
    Likes Received:
    511
    I thought about leaving a cliff hanger, but the format of the story might not leave room for it. The book is actually a guide (told through story) of how to become a superhero, written by the protagonist. So couldn't really put an epilogue in there, as the main character couldn't write about events that haven't happened yet.
     
    Rzero likes this.
  7. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Messages:
    4,153
    Likes Received:
    3,555
    From what I understand it's harder to sell a series or even a sequel with book one than just a single book. And the way you're talking about doing things, the same publisher might not be interested in all these books you have planned. The same agent might not be interested in all your books. And the same readers might not be interested in all these books. Personally, I think it's a mistake to drag this story across several books, spanning multiple genres. From what you've said about your first novel (here and in other places on the forum), I would worry about the humor getting old. It's great to have lots of ideas, but we also have to have the substance to see them through. If this character is going to spend a whole book failing miserably at being a super hero, does he really have to then go to space in another book? It sounds like you're trying to make this sort of cutesy. That's fine, but it will only take you so far.

    I also don't really understand on anticipating multiple books in the same style and with the same MC, before you're anywhere close to finishing the first book. By then you might want to move onto something completely new.

    I'm also not sure what you mean when you say satire. When I think of satire, I think of The New Yorker since they publish satire that is quite good. I also think of books like Animal Form as well as satire essays by Orwell. Satire pokes fun at things in a certain way. It's not necessarily straight comedy. Maybe check out some of the satire pieces in The New Yorker to see what contemporary writers are doing with satire.
     
    jannert likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice