1. froboy69

    froboy69 Member

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    The world without a sun~

    Discussion in 'Setting Development' started by froboy69, Nov 5, 2016.

    So coming up with the world of Noches from my story Rey de Noches, I wanted to go the extra mile and try to make it as epic fantasy as possible. Please note that I am giving all of this information to give you an better impression of how much time I've spent with developing the setting and the consideration. This is a world without a sun, but can it 'work' purely on the fantasy aspect? Will the reader(s) be open-minded enough to the idea?

    I got the idea when I was watching the Avatar series and the Lord of the Rings series. Obviously, Avatar and LOTR gain inspiration from Asian and European cultures respectively. After giving it some thought, it hit me: why is there nothing that is focused on the latin american cultures? Now it took me some time before I actually 'attempted' to make something out of Noches itself. I made this decision because I view the romance languages to be poetic and unique.

    So what is this world about?

    Time

    Obviously the world that exists without a sun is often questioned: how does time work where no sun exists? Well there are two version of night known as 'Night' and 'True Night'.

    There are sixty seconds in a minute, sixty minutes in an hour, thirteen hours for Night and thirteen hours for True Night. Thus making a total of twenty-six hours in a ‘whole night’. Every hour, natural water in the world changes color in a certain order. Thus, living beings in this world tend to keep water in glass containers reflecting ‘real time’. They're able to tell minutes by sensing the cycle in water with basic magic. How they view it varies from living being to living being. For an entire moon cycle, The Moon carries a colored ‘shadow hue’, which lasts for twenty-five Nights, and will convert into a different color afterwards. There is a total of fourteen cycles that make up a ‘blue cycle’. Thus, a complete blue moon is considered as the mark for an entire year. The Moon becomes completely blue in this process instead of just its hue, and this will not occur again until fourteen cycles later. For telling the night of the week, the Moon displays certain markings that you could only tell with a telescope. Hence for the convenience of many, this information is shared like a public calendar like we do in the real world.



    Countries

    Noches, spanish for 'Night', is a world that is comprised of six nations inspired by real world historical nations and empires:

    Hispania - Obviously the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula which was a respective province of theirs. Unlike in the real world where Spain/Portugal did not get to keep these territories, Hispania managed to keep a huge chunk of land that is next to Esmeraldsia. Their origins from their old world (basically whatever version of 'Europe') is vague many and for good reason...

    Gran Esmeraldsia - The name inspired by Emerald, it a nod to the riches and valued 'treasures' that the territory holds. Inspired by the historical union known as Gran Colombia, it has an influence of modern Colombia, Venezuela, Educador, and Panama; the nations which were known to make up the confederation. Costa Rican culture is shown which bridges Esmeraldsia to the Anahuac Union.

    Anahuac Union - Anahuac Union is inspired from the 'Valley of Mexico' and 'Anahuac' is the ancient (Aztec) name of the Valley of Mexico itself. I felt that this was a good name considering that the 'land' itself is surrounded by mountains and volcanoes, and was a centre for several pre-Columbian civilizations, including Teotihuacan, the Toltec, and the Aztec. The ancient Aztec term Anahuac (Land Between the Waters) and the phrase Basin of Mexico are both used at times to refer to the Valley of Mexico today. The Basin of Mexico became a well known site that epitomized the scene of early Classic Mesoamerican cultural development as well. Hence another reason to choose this name. It has a influence of Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica which the latter as I mentioned before, has an ethic culture that bridges the Union with Esmeraldsia.

    Inca Union - If you're savvy with pre-Columbian history, this is from a great empire known as the Incan Empire (and the Inka Empire), known as the largest empire in pre-Columbian America, and argued as the largest empire in the world in the early 16th century. Historically, it had reached as far as Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, although Peru, Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador have the closest post-Spanish intervention heritage ties to this nation. As you would expect, this connects to Esmeraldsia and the country listed below.

    Republic of Argentum - Argentum from the latin word 'silver', this nation has a strong tie to Hispania; like the modern Argentina and Uruguay who have a very close cultural history together. In fact, it's commonly joked that they get confused quite often for the other. With a strong European heritage, they are often confused for Hispanians despite having an Indigenous population as well.

    Republic of Caribilia - Basically consisting of today's latin american countries in the Caribbean, it has a vague history; there are many mysteries due to the legend that the collection of islands was relocated via magic. A feat that is naturally argued and questioned even to this day- NIGHT. So you can expect certain cultural references from latin american countries in the Caribbean like Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Hati, etc. I am purposely being vague about this region for the sake of story telling~



    Now there are certain cultures/countries like Brazil and Paraguay not referenced but there's a reason for that as they ARE within the world of Noches but in a different way. No spoilers sorry.



    Races

    All living things use magic. This is natural because magic is what this world uses commonly as a natural resource; be for powering up technology, or using it within their bodies where they have both a circulatory system for blood and a similar system but for magic. Thus, where a normal human heart would be on the left chest, they also carry a magical heart on the right chest. And of course, this applies to other races or creatures with their own system. The main usage of magic in their bodies is for controlling body temperature; no sun = freezing your ass off...

    Humans - Do I really need to explain? Aside from the magic system that we all carry, it's not uncommon for eye color and hair color to be influence by magic; one could have dark green hair and orange eyes just because...

    Scales - Once known to be giant underground reptiles, this intelligent species were well-respect in ancient times to that of dragons in mythology; although wingless. That being said, at one point in their history, Scales realized that their large bodies made it difficult to maintain magic which forced them to stay as deep underground as possible where raw sources of magic existed. Thus, they eventually learned to adapt their body structure to that of a human and are quite social. A running gag is while they are naturally cold blooded, they enjoy alcoholic drinks to 'warm' themselves despite that being a common real-world myth. Yet it works for them somehow... That being said, they're generally common like humans.

    Lunarians - One who comes from the moon itself, Lunarians look exactly human, save for their white hair and white colored eyes. While rare, they are seemingly kind and social despite their influence on making others uncomfortable. Due to the fact that every non-Lunarian holds extreme sensitivity to their own magic. They are often seen as the children of Luna herself.

    Brazuka - Unique, their hair is fire itself but does not burn. Sharp teeth and non-human skin color, they are barely different from humans and are found everywhere across Noches.

    Imperdonables - I don't want to spoil much but basically these are the race that does NOT benefit from magic as a necessary; when they breathe, they release something that unbalances magic itself to the point where it can destroy it. However, they are considerate enough that they invented masks that naturally filters out this toxic to magic. Often discriminated, they hold a strong belief that all living things have become too reliant on magic itself. Ironically, they are commonly the strongest users of magic itself.

    Importance of Magic

    Magic itself is an important aspect in this world. Because of way how life is, Magic has always been there like oxygen. It influenced many possibilities with science and religion. It has a common raw form where its properties is hot and dangerous; think of lava in a way. Because it comes in different forms, magic can either help or harm you depending on how it's presented before you. Hell it's a natural light source where plant life 'glows'. Because of it 'always existing', all living things are able to interact with it naturally to some extent, depending on who or what they are. Also, using magic as various possibilities, giving it many forms via various mediums. Hence the form its matter is versatile and not meant to be, "Oh I am able to slow my drop because of magic. Just because." .

    No, actually 'using' magic has rules and conditions as well as limitations. Because of this, they incorporate magic as a valued resource with technology quite often within the typical life style; a typical human being should be able to 'pour magic' into a lamp which gives it power to light up. You would then remove the magic within the lamp to turn it off. A chef would condition raw meat and make it appealing in various ways before actually cooking it. A watch smith has a tool made from a particular material that can change shape if he/she knows how to interact with said material's proprieties. Depending on your trade or life style, you learn certain skills that would apply to you.

    Magic is used via the language which is commonly Spanish. Although the main character begins to learn that the parent language Latin has other languages (French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, etc.) that is used in Noches. But for the sake of keeping things simple, Spanish in this world is reference as 'magic' and the main language used for magic.

    I thought at first this would be 'cheap' to always use magic as the explanation, but it's more than that; it brings an argument of how much life can be different if you add something that is a game changer. In fact, the main character does begin to question if magic is really a benefit or even a weakness.



    Questions:
    That being said, many often try to pseudoscience the story. The idea here is for the reader to use their imagination and theorize what 'magic' really is in this world. Can you view this as a believable world? If so or if not, what recommendations would you give? Is it better to just keep it pure fantasy and not try to explain how it works? Is it a gamble for me to explain with how magic is a resource that this world has become on? Only for it to provoke even more questions from readers because I took the time to explain magic as a physical and valuable resource? Is it a mistake for me to reference real world cultures which would make this world less believable due to the other factors?


    Please give me your thoughts as I am conflicting about this. Not all my questions need to be answered but I do wish for feed black please.
     
  2. Rosacrvx

    Rosacrvx Contributor Contributor

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    It all seems well and good, except for this little detail: how do you explain life without the Sun? This is not my area of studies, but the Sun is necessary for photosynthesis, which is the process by which we get our oxygen. The Sun is also related to how life appeared on Earth in the first place (according to the theories I'm aware of anyway). But let's even imagine the Earth was populated by an alien race instead (that has become us), the moment you have no Sun many species don't exist or disappear. In your world, was there always no Sun, or did it disappear?
    If I were you I'd write my story in a fictional planet that has nothing to do with Earth (especially names of places like those you've mentioned, because that imagery will make the reader think of Earth). Be prepared to make up all new species of beings, and good luck! ;)
     
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  3. froboy69

    froboy69 Member

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    Based on theories and observations, there are planets without suns and it's been theorized that a planet could support marine life but under many and deep layers of ice. That being said, for even the chance that life can exist, a planet would need a particular alternate source of heat. This is where magic in raw form (lava like or any other heated matter) is located throughout this world deep underground. Hence I decided that magic needed to become the most valuable resource for all living things. But's my take/idea on how this world works without a sun. I am no scientist and I want the main focus to be fantasy and not that much in sci-fi, but I thought that people would have fun with this idea. Magic is also the fertilizer in plants, giving it all that is needed to grow and develop. This would make the resource of magic itself even of a mystery and even questionable of what it 'actually is'...

    And yes, I like your idea about influence from space and how a sun could have actually influenced this world at one point; not one to spoil but I have considered it! :) It's always good to consider such promising factors and one of the goals that I want to achieve: having more like yourself theorizing in matters such as that. :)

     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2016
  4. BayView

    BayView Huh. Interesting. Contributor

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    I didn't read all of this - most of it seems unrelated to the sun (like, the names of the cultures). And I got stuck at the "no sun" idea.

    Does the planet have a path in space? I'm far from an astronomer, but... we're where we are because of the sun's gravitational pull, right? If we didn't have a sun, I assume we'd drift off into space... which might be fine? We'd be a huge comet, maybe? I'm not sure. Eventually I think we'd drift into another star's field and either get burned up or establish an orbit, but this could take a really, really long time, considering how empty space is, so maybe your planet is just going through the "drifting" stage of the process? I don't know - the astronomy is beyond me.

    More significantly, though, without a sun we'd have no life. Photosynthesis doesn't just give us oxygen, it gives us all the energy from plants. What do creatures and people on your planet eat? What drives the chemical reactions that create this food?

    Where did life on your planet come from? Based on the similarities to Earth I'm assuming it's some sort of lost Earth colony? But why would colonists land on a lifeless rock? Maybe they crash landed... and had enough resources with them to terraform an entire planet, without harnessing any sort of solar energy? (I don't mean solar energy from man-made solar panels, I mean solar energy like the sun, making things grow, providing heat, light, etc.)

    What's creating the glow of your moon? On Earth, that's reflected light from the sun. On your planet, what's being reflected?

    I think weird worlds are fine, but this one seems way too weird, to me. I can't see how it would work.
     
  5. Iain Sparrow

    Iain Sparrow Banned Contributor

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    Instead, how about a world called Nachos... a place with endless tortilla chips and oceans made of cheese sauce?:)

    Seriously though, test how strong your story is by subtracting the magic.
    If after you've removed the magic elements in your plot, and there's not enough story left... perhaps it is 'cheap'?
     
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  6. Lea`Brooks

    Lea`Brooks Contributor Contributor

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    I could get behind the lack of sun if it came with a proper explanation. Like if the sun once existed, no matter how long ago, but the planet got ejected from orbit, like a rogue planet, and had to figure out a way to sustain life. That I could handle.

    What I am having a hard time with though is the water and moon changing colors. Why does this happen? How does this happen? I know you said you're not a scientist, but when creating a new planet (not just a fantasy world), you really need good explanations for these things.

    With a good explanation for why they change colors, I could get behind one of them -- but not both. Both is too much for me. It's too coincidental that both just happen to change colors to tell the time of day and year (or month).
     
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  7. Infel

    Infel Contributor Contributor

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    I actually really liked the idea of timekeeping through water changing colors. I think that sounded really cool, and I'm ready to believe it as long as you offer me even a vague explanation.

    What I'm hung up on is, like the other people, the lack of a sun. As mentioned, the sun's gravitational pull keeps us in orbit and it makes sure we don't float off into nothing. Additionally, the idea that bacteria learned to absorb energy from the sun is responsible for the creation of oxygen as a waste product--which animals grew to use to live. Life on earth developed specifically because of the things we have going for us: a sun, a moon, an atmosphere, an ocean where oxygen creating life can develop. Take away any one of those things, and a huge piece of the puzzle is missing. Especially because the Sun has played probably the most important part in our evolution, when you think about it.

    Also, more on the gravity portion of things, Earth's orbit around the Sun and the Moon's orbit around earth keeps the planet steady, and saves us from wild climate swings. Because of that, and because the earth is on a tilted axis, we have seasons--which are also mega important to life.

    I assume your planet ONCE had a sun, because just by doing that you can justify how life got started, yadda yadda. And how it vanished isn't terribly important to me, so long as you give me an explanation. As a matter of fact, for me personally, if the first two lines of your book were "Once we had a sun. But it's gone now." I'd be like "Oh well that blows," and move on with my reading.

    So you'd have to make me believe two things:

    1) where is the planet getting its heat so that the crust of it doesn't freeze over?
    2) What is it orbiting around that is making sure it doesn't fly off into oblivion?

    Number one isn't too bad, if you're fine abusing the heck out of magic. Maybe your atmosphere is so dense and thick that it acts as a huge blanket for your world and traps the heat inside. Humans could probably learn to live with that over the course of a few thousand years, although I'd do some research on it first. Maybe your people just have little warm protective magic bubbles, and the world outside them is a frozen wasteland.

    Number two is harder. You need the planet rotating around something, and that something has to be consistent, or else we get the aforementioned world-altering climate changes that cause mass extinction.

    It SOUNDS cool though, and with some good research and careful pulling of strings, it could be a great story. The sun is such an all important thing for mankind, that reading about one missing might be a really powerful journey if you do it right. Plus think of all the metaphors you could go into!

    Hope that helped somewhat!
     
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  8. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Contributor

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    Put some kind of microscopic organism in the water that's harmless but produces varying pigments over the course of the day on a set timeline, so that time can be kept by it.
     
  9. BayView

    BayView Huh. Interesting. Contributor

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    Could the sun just be very, very weak? Still a huge mass out there, in terms of gravity and what not, and producing enough light (energy) to have allowed life to begin, but not enough for it to play the huge role it plays in life on Earth?
     
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  10. Cave Troll

    Cave Troll It's Coffee O'clock everywhere. Contributor

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    I don't think a sunless planet would work very well.

    Orbiting a dead star, it would decay into the high gravity dead star and destroy the planet.

    Orbiting around nothing would cause it bump into all manner of stuff, until it eventually
    gets captured in an orbit around a very large planet or star. Though in either case it would
    likely have suffered significant surface damage rendering it inert of all forms of life.

    The only way to possibly pull this off is if the planet is in tidal lock with a massive planet
    that orbits with out spin, and does not see the sun as a result. Though it would probably
    be knocked away if it were hit with enough force to be sent further out/in the system.
    Or it would slowly decay in orbit until it collided in the planet that it is tidally locked with.
    Or it would simply just drift away to get captured by another body large enough that has a
    gravitational spin that is really far from the star it orbits.

    Though in all of the cases your planet would need to produce heat somehow, as nothing
    except tardigrades can survive in space and are damn near microscopic. So unless your
    planet has core heat vents for a molten core, or even more interesting one of high temperature
    plasma to heat the surface to a degree that would make life possible to begin with.
    It would still have to have an atmosphere unless the things inhabiting it are made entirely
    of mineral like substances to survive in the airless environment. But even then they would
    need some form of 'fuel' to simply get around.

    The only feasible way to get this too work is if the planet surface is blacked out due
    heavy cloud cover from the star it orbits. Though the inhabitants would have to
    have migrated to the planet from somewhere else at one point in their history
    several thousand years ago, to justify why no one knows why or how they are
    on such an inhospitable world.
    Night worlds exist in Warhammer 40K, but they take a star and someone to
    either travel there, or the natives to pollute the atmosphere so much that the
    sun can not reach the planets surface.

    Unless they all believe that they are a singular rock that is held with some
    kind of magical properties, it would be highly unlikely that anything would
    evolve there. But then again since you have magic in your world, perhaps
    the planet is magic as well (though it will take a bit of explaining the how
    and why of it).

    Good luck. :p
     
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  11. tonguetied

    tonguetied Contributor Contributor

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    The lack of a sun as we know it is not a problem in my mind. Although the Sun is a major part of life on our planet there can be other sources of energy that don't originate from a star. You really seemed more focused on it being dark and darker all the time which is fine, I would suggest that your orbiting moon is really a source of energy such as having a very strong magnetic field, extremely strong gravitational field, or something like that and its movement "around" Noches creates the heat energy that everyone seems to expect for life, etc., think of an electric motor. As far as drifting around in space - uh, yeah we do that ourselves, we happen to orbit the Sun but overall we are on a multibillion year journey to nowhere or everywhere however you prefer it.

    My real problem with the story concept is using the term magic, if everything depends on it then it would not be magic, just as we have no real clue as to how consciousness exists for us. The fact that everything has these unexplained powers makes magic the norm which seems non-magical to me.

    Back to the dark and darker, we use sun light to see because that is the way life evolved, from an evolutionary standpoint. It was available and receptors that could detect it were able to refine that capability to create what we call vision. Bats use sonar, they probably do have some vision but their primary physical cue is sonar. Dogs and probably most animals use smells and sounds as the first clue to their surrounding. Also time doesn't require sun light to be "discovered", your color changes doing that purpose is okay but you will have to explain how color is perceived, I suspect a different band of radiation such as x-rays, distant starlight, or some natural fluorescence available.
     
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  12. froboy69

    froboy69 Member

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    Thank you all for the feedback. As the sci-fi genre is opened, I have considered this world having a secret history; this world and the lifestyle that is shown has 'always been'. They believe that the stars they see in the sky are moons because they've never seen a sun. Hell it might not be a rouge planet but one that has a LONG orbit around a star but too far away to actually be (mainly) affected by it other than gravity. It could be quite young or quite old depending how you look at it.

    It brings more mystery to the world and it brings more to one's imagination. I haven't decided on the fate of this world and if I plan to keep it completely fantasy without going beyond the moon that this world has.

    Most fantasy realms/worlds tend to bend reality in more ways than one but I felt that this world can spark the minds of potential readers and (once again) make their own theories on the matter. Because there are things that we do not understand in the universe and have yet to uncover even 1% of its mysteries. I am pretty excited that this allows me to be flexible with options.

    But yes, maybe I should remember that while a lot of stories set in worlds that contradict our understanding of reality 'get away with it', I hope that I'll be able to continue pacing my story and make it more and more believable. Then again, I am already pushing it to some extent. :eek:

    I'll be sure to continue explaining more and more of this world as the series progresses. Thank you all so much for your feedback and honesty. :oops:
     
  13. Rosacrvx

    Rosacrvx Contributor Contributor

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    @froboy69
    Your post is long and I admit that I didn't read it all yesterday. The thing that struck me immediately was the "no Sun" part, but I skipped through your paragraphs so I'd have a general idea. Much of your premise intrigued me enough to come back with a better reply.
    Your premise, the way you're presenting it to us, does touch the genre of science fiction. As you can see from the replies above, it is the first thing that people think: how does life exist without a sun, and also the gravitational part (which I haven't considered but has been addressed by other posters). The only way I think you can get away with it without science fiction is to bring as little attention to it as possible.
    I think I know where you had this idea from. In Middle Earth there was a time when the elves had no sun, and there were these elves that loved the light of the stars, etc. Am I right? This was possible because Tolkien's god (I forget the name, sorry) created these races like the God of the Bible created Adam. This way, there's no need to explain evolution. Still, later, Tolkien's God created something that replaced the sun (night and day luminaries of sorts, but again I forget, sorry) which explains for all the plants and life that exist by the time of LOTR.
    This is why I asked if they had a sun before, and lost it. Maybe you don't have to explain it. Maybe the characters don't know anything about science and can't explain it either. They are there and they are alive, much like people were here and alive before there was a scientific explanation. Knowing people, though, if you want to make it believable, surely these races would have religion/myths to explain their existence. Don't forget to include an explanation of how the Moon changes colour.
    And that's how you can explain it without making it a scientific matter. Your story has to be powerful enough to keep the reader uninterested in asking these questions. If the reader is asking these questions instead of paying attention to the story, the story is failing. It's all about suspension of disbelief. You have to keep the reader engrossed in the story so much that they don't want to question the science behind it (and still, many readers will!).
    I'll give you one good example. The Walking Dead is one of the most successful shows on TV, and yet I've come across very amusing discussions on how do zombies "live" and whatnot, even amongst the biggest fans of the show! It amuses me because the last thing I want to think about is the "how". I've accepted that it is how it is and that's why the show is entertaining.
    What I mean is: don't give your readers ammunition to distract them from the story. Your story has to be gripping enough to do this.

    All this said, I'm not a big reader of fantasy, so I'm not you target audience, but I can be that fringe audience that will read if the story is enticing enough. Which leads me to the next point, what has really interested me in your "universe".

    I got the idea when I was watching the Avatar series and the Lord of the Rings series. Obviously, Avatar and LOTR gain inspiration from Asian and European cultures respectively. After giving it some thought, it hit me: why is there nothing that is focused on the latin american cultures? Now it took me some time before I actually 'attempted' to make something out of Noches itself. I made this decision because I view the romance languages to be poetic and unique.

    This is a very interesting premise for a setting. Especially the part where it involves the Portuguese, lol! But I'm not entirely joking, you could have a good way to sell it to the people(s) involved. If I knew that you were referring to the Portuguese somehow, of course I'd want to read! It would be a first in fantasy! I'm sure the same applies to the Spanish. And Latin America is a very big market as well.
    So, my advice: forget about using the name Hispania, or Iberia, or anything that actually exists. In case you don't know, it is insulting for the Portuguese and the Spanish to be agglomerated into a single nation. If you use something like the Old World to refer to us, you'd get away with it because you'd be creating a fictional people and it wouldn't upset anyone.
    The same way, I recommend that you don't use the word Inca. No idea about Anahuac. I like the Republic of Argentum because you're going to the root of it without spelling out Argentina. Not sure about Caribilia, maybe it's too close to the original.
    There are other ways to provide the reader with hints about which civilisation you're getting your inspiration from without referring to the real name of places. For instance, I don't know that much of Latin America's culture, but if you describe a ritual like the Dia de los Muertos (spelling?) I'll immediately think of Mexico and at the same time you're keeping it fictional.
    What you need, above all, is a very compelling story that will keep the reader hooked enough to be interested in your fictional universe.
    I hope I was able to get my ideas across clearly and that this has been helpful to you. You have a good setting there, I hope it works.
     
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  14. froboy69

    froboy69 Member

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    Oh but of course! The story doesn't focus on how there's no sun or how things particularly work; my explanation in my first post is something for readers to understand the lore and setting. I wrote the story in a way where it's not pushed up against your face to stress the living conditions and how 'this world works'. I only reference their life style in matters such as, "Ruiz sighed in relief as the environment was rich in magic. Already did he begin to remove his coat as the temperature continued to increase. It's more volatile than I thought. I should have dressed lightly and simply raise my body heat, thought Ruiz. " or " Ruiz cursed as he continued to shiver. 'Damn them all! I am freezing and I can't gather enough magic!'". And of course, "Ruiz watched the sky and smiled as the moon's tone began to convert. "Finally this cycle is over," he commented, pleased to see the hue as purple rather than green.

    Not written like that exactly but enough to feed information to the reader and not focus. Also to give you a clearer idea on how I explained things to the reader. A little note while being discreet at the same time.

    Actually, I am not that savvy with LOTR; I am not a hardcore fan but I always thought of it as being a perfect example of European fantasy; at least with the middle ages. But that IS interesting to know!


    Science is done to some extent but it's not as heavily relied; if I had to decide, magic has had a major influence on this world's version of science itself. Hell a lot of their technology relies on magic too as a natural resource and not the influence on reality as often as other fantasy series. As for the last part, I couldn't agree more; I feel that the religion/myths around this world does play the important role that is needed. And I can happily tell you that the series will reveal more over time.

    Great advice! I considered that as well and I am happy that you're keeping me checked on that! :)

    Oh yes; Portuguese does have a role. Mind you I am not savvy with the language but I am learning more with the culture and influences that it has on the world. I do plan to touch on that language next within the series.

    I would imagine; I know that that people argue that Hispania involved both the lands of Portugal and Spain, but it is commonly reference as the Spanish and with little regard to the Portuguese. Not recognizing that it involved various and different pre-roman empire cultures and even modern ones would be disrespectful. I vow that the influences based on real world cultures will be respected and reference correctly. I feel that this has to be paced and not all forced immediately; politics and culture is something that I plan to balance and not rush. One's heritage always needs to be tribute properly and I plan to do that.

    Anahuac is the term used as a reference to the Basin of Mexico (or Valley of Mexico) that the Aztecs used; it pitomized the scene of early Classic Mesoamerican cultural development. Hence I thought that this was a good name to use with 'union'. Yeah Caribilia is hit and miss even for me but I am sticking with it.

    Anyway I am afraid that this is where I must insist and disagree; one of the major reasons for me using these names and making these influences 'recognizable' was to raise cultural awareness. And yes, I know that it's a weird thing to say considering that this IS a fantasy world and a lot of it is made up mambo jumbo, but this allows the readers an easier time to identify with what culture is referenced. I am going to offend someone despite my desire not to. I am already doing this when people view this from a scientific point. It's a gamble yes, but it's purposely fictional and fantasy while referencing actuate cultural aspects into the mix. We see this in LOTR and the Avatar series.


    Your words of advice is helpful indeed. I am not feeding my ego when I say that I already knew in regards to what you're advising me but rather to acknowledge the fact that it it's important advice nonetheless. I must keep myself humble and remember to take as much as constructive criticism as possible. It helps me a lot. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2016
  15. Rosacrvx

    Rosacrvx Contributor Contributor

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    Glad I was helpful. :)

    I do recommend reading the History of Middle Earth and the Silmarillion and everything related to the LOTR universe to anyone who has enjoyed the Ring's trilogy. There's so much more and so very interesting before the action in LOTR.

    In my previous post, I forgot to quote this part from @tonguetied:

    It's a very good point and I subscribe.

    Well, then you already know the "little regard to the Portuguese" and where I'm coming from. :D
    I will be very glad if authors just don't mix us together with the Spanish, it's all I'm asking. ;)

    Good luck with your work!
     
  16. pyroglyphian

    pyroglyphian Word Painter

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    Yes, let your imagination run. Really liked the water-changing-colour idea; don't care how it works.
     
  17. froboy69

    froboy69 Member

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    That gives me an idea....
     

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