1. lowcarb

    lowcarb New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1

    There is a question of the action-reaction cycle of the description.

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by lowcarb, Jan 14, 2019.

    There is an incomprehensible part of the theories related to writing know-how. While reading the theory of the cycle of behavior and reactions mentioned in the program Novell factory, I was wondering.
    Why should we only describe facts when describing an action? When I read about the depth of time, I said it was good to describe what happened from the point of view of the POV. So why do we have to tell the truth here? I want to know why the filter for creative expression should not work.


    it's image link
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Azuresun

    Azuresun Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2017
    Messages:
    328
    Likes Received:
    436
    You....don't have to? This looks like yet another bit of writing advice that mistakenly presents a possible approach as the one true way. Take it or leave it,
     
  3. BayView

    BayView Not even a little tender Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2014
    Messages:
    10,797
    Likes Received:
    11,589
    I agree with @Azuresun that this is one more example of someone trying to make a suggestion into an absolute rule. Usually I recommend that people just try stuff and see what works for them, but in this case I feel like the "rule" is actually really close to wrong. If you're writing in a close POV (whether first or third person) I can see absolutely no justification for zooming out of that POV for a paragraph of far more distant description. And if you do zoom out, you'll be losing a really valuable opportunity to enrich the characterization of the POV character.

    I don't know the context, but I really don't like this advice.
     
  4. John Calligan

    John Calligan Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2015
    Messages:
    1,360
    Likes Received:
    1,336
    "No bias based on the protagonist."

    Are new trad published books being made like this? It seems like people want character voice in all prose and no author voice if it can be helped. I know I've read books with objective narrator descriptions, maybe not any new books.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019
  5. Azuresun

    Azuresun Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2017
    Messages:
    328
    Likes Received:
    436
    That, and sometimes it might be important for a story not to give an objective account of an event--say, it turns out that a character was mistaken about something they witnessed, or it's a Rashomon style tale where witnesses to the same event are lying or misremembering what really happened.
     
  6. ChickenFreak

    ChickenFreak Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    Messages:
    14,979
    Likes Received:
    12,493
    Chiming in to agree that this advice makes no sense whatsoever to me. Were any examples offered?

    Is this for something other than normal fiction, like maybe games?? Maybe they're thinking of some much narrower context than we're hearing? Or...or...I'm at a loss.
     
  7. ChickenFreak

    ChickenFreak Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    Messages:
    14,979
    Likes Received:
    12,493
    I Googled some of the text and found the advice and an example. It really seems to just be telling you to offer events in...the order that the occur.

    That is, instead of (to make up my own bad example) you DON'T say:

    Jane was horrified. Her stomach was clenching. She was terrified. Oh, no, no! The villains were coming toward her!

    You instead have (a still-bad rewritten example):

    The villains were coming toward Jane. She was horrified... (blah de blah).

    So, usually, when a character reacts to Event, you (usually) first let the reader know what the Event was. You usually hear the gunshot before feeling the bullet in the character's gut, lift the soup spoon before tasting the garlic, and so on.

    This was not already obvious?

    (Edited to add: I note that the "no bias based on the protagonist" was, of course, violated in the examples on the web page. Because it makes no sense. I think they're stating the advice extra-dramatically for drama.)
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
    John Calligan likes this.
  8. big soft moose

    big soft moose All killer, no filler. Contributor Community Volunteer

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2016
    Messages:
    10,623
    Likes Received:
    11,895
    Location:
    East devon/somerset border
    QFT - and personally I'd leave it
     

Share This Page