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  1. CGB

    CGB Active Member

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    This grammatically correct?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by CGB, Jul 25, 2016.

    here is the sentence:

    I try to help out if I can, even when the task is something that is tedious, annoying, or technically someone else’s (i.e. a social worker’s) job.


    here is the other sentence:

    I have always been able to get along with the vast majority of people, and most tend to like me, even my in-laws (actually a bigger accomplishment than you may think).


    Are these grammatically correct?
     
  2. minstrel

    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    They look okay to me. I prefer, though, in fiction, to avoid using parentheses. That's just a personal preference.
     
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  3. OurJud

    OurJud Contributing Member Contributor

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    Like minstrel, they appear fine to me, but also like minstrel I don't like to see bracketed sentences.
     
  4. ChickenFreak

    ChickenFreak Contributing Member Contributor

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    The placing of "even my in-laws" feels faintly off, but I can't phrase why. But I think it's fine for fiction. If it were, say, a law or government regulation I would wonder about ambiguity.
     
  5. thirdwind

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    You need a comma after "i.e." in the first example.
     
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  6. CGB

    CGB Active Member

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    Oh this was a question for something non-fiction.
     
  7. Oscar Leigh

    Oscar Leigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    I guess so. But your title isn't. :bigtongue::bigtongue:
     
  8. Shadowfax

    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

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    i.e. = id est = that is.
    e.g. = exempli gratia = free example/for instance

    So, where you say ...technically someone else’s (i.e. a social worker’s) job... you're saying that is the social worker's job; I think you mean that it's someone else's (for instance, a social worker's) job. That means that the i.e. should be changed to e.g.
     
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  9. Sack-a-Doo!

    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'd remove the first comma in both sentences, but that may come down to personal preference. It's not really needed and I don't think it comes under the Oxford rule.
     
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