1. Roberta Parsnip

    Roberta Parsnip New Member

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    Thoughts on "grounded" fantasy

    Discussion in 'Fantasy' started by Roberta Parsnip, Dec 13, 2020.

    I write some pretty grounded fantasy novels. I was wondering what other people thought about having more grounded fantasy. Do you prefer majestic, almost dream like worlds or more things rooted in reality.
     
  2. Night Herald

    Night Herald Malfunctioning clockwork person Supporter Contributor

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    Like Low Fantasy contra High Fantasy, you mean?

    I like both, depending on what I'm in the mood for. A lot comes down to execution. I usually prefer things to be fairly grounded, or "realistic", if you will. I like my fantasy worlds and the people in them to feel like they could really exist. I am a big fan of the otherworldly and bizarre, but I want it built on a sturdy foundation of realism (Gormenghast, Books of Babel) or a strong comedic sensibility (Discworld).

    On the writing side of things I lean more towards outrageous, flighty stuff. It's fun to indulge your creativity like that. But even then I like to keep a core of mundanity so the extravagant bits pop better.

    The short, sweet answer is that I prefer things to be fairly middle-of-the-road: not too fantastical, but strange enough to be interesting.
     
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  3. peachalulu

    peachalulu Member Reviewer Contributor

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    I like low grade fantasy - The Mouse and the Motorcycle type fantasy. Everything was real except for a talking mouse and his ability to ride a toy motorbike going puh-ba-ba-ba.
     
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  4. Roberta Parsnip

    Roberta Parsnip New Member

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    Hey, I actually liked the explanation they give as to why the boy and Ralph can talk to each other and weren't surprised that they could. The author just said they shared a love for motorcycles and left it at that. It was perfect.
     
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  5. jannert

    jannert Retired Mod Supporter Contributor

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    I know I am not (usually) a fan of 'majestic, dreamed-up worlds,' unless I can quickly find my feet there. Whatever the 'world' is like, I want it to seem real to me. I also need to identify with the characters. I can put up with a certain amount of distance between me and characters, if the environment is novel enough to get me intrigued. But sooner or later—preferably sooner—I need to 'be there.' Otherwise, I lose interest.

    One of the characteristics of Robert E Howard's Conan stories or Kull stories ...pulp fantasy fiction extraordinare ...was his ability to IMMEDIATELY fix the reader in the world of his story. I think he did this because his characters usually entered the scene doing or experiencing something fairly visceral. They weren't just 'described' against a fantastical background. They were in it. Getting cold, wet, hungry, fed up. They were experiencing something, and his writing style got me, the reader, to experience it as well. And I got hooked.
     
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