1. Foxxx

    Foxxx The Debonair Contributor

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    Translating techniques from other media to writing?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Foxxx, Nov 5, 2018.

    Apologies if a thread already exists about this. I couldn't find one that was what I was looking for, but then again the search function on this forum has always proved unreliable to me for some reason.

    I took a film class and of the many things I learned (most of which I've forgot), one of the concepts I learned about was transitioning from scene to scene using similarly shaped objects. So, cereal bowl to shower-head, eyeball to the bowl of a toilet. The purpose is to create a sense of continuity or to help create a meaningful connection between two objects.

    Other means of transition include sounds. The siren of an emergency vehicle and the noise of one's alarm clock.

    Or one more example: I'm by no means a film critic or watch a lot of anime. I imagine what I'm about to explain is common in other entertainment, like sitcoms or The Walking Dead / GoT. A favorite anime series of mine, Fate: stay night, has really good pacing and other well executed aspects.

    By pacing, I'm talking about how there's either a fight, or a build-up to a fight, or suspense-- and the writer(s?) really know when to give the viewer a break. But the breaks aren't just filler; no time is wasted in further exploring and developing the cast of characters, and their relationships with one another. And the end of each episode isn't always a "cliffhanger" necessarily, but it definitely makes one want to binge the whole series in a single night. Each episode typically resolves the "question" or *a* question, or reveals something important. You get a real sense that things are progressing in a believable and natural way. It would appear to me that this sense or feeling is pretty fragile and requires the hands of an expert surgeon to get right. I'm being slightly hyperbolic, but it's easy to tell when a show is stagnating or wasting time, or alternatively when it is moving too quickly.

    Undoubtedly the common ground with all this is the subject of storytelling, so much of what I'm saying is true across all forms of media/entertainment as long as what's being told is a story.

    But the expression of such concepts comes out differently from medium to medium. I for one think it can be really useful to examine scene structure (at a storytelling level) by watching a well-written anime series or television show. Mainly because it might accomplish the key parts of scene structure in a different way. It might also be helpful to have a visualization of the process shown to you as it goes along. And lastly, it may give one some refreshing ways of approaching their writing.

    What are your thoughts? Are there any techniques from other storytelling mediums that you believe have influenced your writing in a valuable way?
     
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  2. John Calligan

    John Calligan Contributor Contributor

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    I've been using some "Save the Cat" and "Anatomy of Story" stuff while outlining the book I'm working on, and I've probably watched a solid 20 hours of Film Courage videos on YouTube. I was skeptical of Truby's screenplay writing method because it seemed canned and fake when I started, and I had a hard time coming up with an outline. I've probably rewritten everything from the premise on half a dozen times.

    But now, I'm really happy with how my outline is turning out. It came together well and I feel really attached to it. The screenwriting style is pretty rigorous, and I'm not good at it yet, but I think it's awesome.
     
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  3. Foxxx

    Foxxx The Debonair Contributor

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    I remember seeing those on Amazon. I took a look at them but I came away with the same skepticism you did and just never looked back. I can appreciate that there are "a pirate's guidelines" to storytelling, and that there *are* things that should be accomplished in the first page for example. But there quickly comes a point for me, personally, where painting-by-numbers sickens me. I guess it's okay if he's not advertising it as "the one and only way", but just one proven way of many.

    However, I'm just a big fan of having freedom and exploring and experimenting; I'd rather have an Elder Scrolls or a Fallout or a Cyberpunk 2077 than just on-rails experiences like Call of Duty (not that there's anything inherently wrong with the latter).

    A sandbox needs boundaries but I actually want to have room to be able to play in the sandbox still. And you can make the same thing on a beach as you can in a sandbox, and similarly one can make a snowman with snow as well as sand.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2018
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  4. John Calligan

    John Calligan Contributor Contributor

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    Truby's method DOES seem like a way of writing something that promises to have an incredible amount of density and character / external arcs that line up, but man I can think of so many shows and stories I love that aren't about that life. No character arc. Episodic chapter adventures. Side characters that don't contribute. Sometimes that's what I want. Sometimes I just want to see someone who has "weaknesses" that are not directly attacked by the plot, because sometimes that's inspiring.

    Batman has weaknesses. Batman is a control freak that works alone and thinks he should be in charge of everyone, but sometimes I just want to watch him do some karate and solve a mystery by himself and learn nothing, cause it is cool.
     
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  5. Foxxx

    Foxxx The Debonair Contributor

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    Maybe I should budge a little on this specific matter, and give them a read.

    I say that because that *is* something I want to be able to do. It's one of the things that I love so much about Fate: stay night. How all the different arcs are progressing, intertwining, and eventually culminate in the end.

    But more than that, it's how that's accomplished so seamlessly and doesn't feel contrived. It would seem to require an admirable understanding of pacing.

    You're right though. That's also why I like Batman. And James Bond. Iron Man, Indiana Jones, Han Solo, Sherlock Holmes...
     
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  6. John Calligan

    John Calligan Contributor Contributor

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    You might like Anatomy of Story if you are interested in "Fate." He has whole chapters about how to map out, organize, combine, and weave scenes together to get that sort of effect.

    Honestly, the part that feels fake is the prescribed order you brainstorm in. Normally, internet writing advice says you should think of a compelling character, and then throw rocks at them until they die or get what they want and can take a break, and that it is all about attaching to that character through the little details, sympathy, and so on.

    In Truby's book, you come up with the action taken first, like, "A high school student learns to command a powerful familiar and the associated magical spells in order to defeat 12 great warriors and save the world." Then, you ask yourself, "what kinds of people have a mental problem that keeps them from doing it." Cowardice would be good. Aloofness would be another. Then you figure out how their mental problem is hurting people. Say, people are suffering because the main character is too aloof. Then you figure out how he changes. "Aloof high school student becomes engaged with his friends and family by entering a wizarding contest and winning."

    Or better: An aloof high school student is forced into a contest of wizards, and through the deepening friendships with his friends and family, is able to master the magics and familiars to win."

    Then you come up with an opponent that directly attacks his weakness--someone that does more damage because he is aloof. Like he starts infecting his friends and family, and his influence goes unnoticed. You give the hero and opponent the same goal, and figure out how their conflicting worldviews cause them to go at it in different ways.

    and so on and on. This build out keeps going until you have a huge outline, and then your write the book/script or whatever.

    And yeah, it felt canned when I started it, but my mind just kept working it until I got to something I loved that fit the bill.

    Edit: I was trying to use "Fate" in my examples but I haven't seen it for awhile.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2018
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  7. xanadu

    xanadu Contributor Contributor

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    I try to be very conscious of the differences between media, since it’s very easy to fall into the trap of writing from the perspective of an audience member at the movies. However, I do have one stylistic approach that is mostly inspired by other media, namely video games, and that’s my preference for minimal backstory and setup.

    I think I can specifically trace it to the game Inside where I picked up on it for the first time. But there are plenty of games that drop you into the world with absolutely no explanation and make you figure out what’s going on by yourself.

    Again, though, it’s important to recognize the difference. In these games, you have the visual aspect—things can play out in the background to clue the player in. You don’t have that in prose. But even still, games like Inside, The Last Guardian, or Rime show just how little people really need to get a story going. And the author can still use things going on in the background as clues—it just has to be written the right way.

    I find I’ve struggled much less with my openings ever since.
     
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  8. DeeDee

    DeeDee Senior Member

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    I wanna see how that translates to book form o_O, with actual examples. And without being annoying :D (I've read examples of that one, thankyouverymuch, and the novelty of it wears off very quickly).

    The movie industry borrows heavily from book storytelling, so most of it's tricks have already been done in books and not the other way around. The above examples (of transitions) are more of a movie original but it's something that heavily relies on visuals and sound, and those are quite difficult to do right in a book so I don't think they are especially useful to a writer. Anime on the other hand tends to be very choppy in it's storytelling, so that doesn't translate well to books either. :whistle:
     
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  9. Foxxx

    Foxxx The Debonair Contributor

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    That's cool. We sort of found the same thing through video games, except the game I'd personally trace it to is Dark Souls. I agree that once you realize part of the hook *is* figuring out what's going on, this totally changes your approach to telling the story.

    "And the author can still use things going on in the background as clues -- it just has to be written the right way." Exactly.

    EDIT: Another thing I always struggled with was worrying over getting the reader to believe in the story. It took me a long time to realize there's a significant difference between "believability" and "realism". Or, maybe more accurately, "realism" is relative to the universe you've created. Your rules have to be consistent.

    Well yeah, such transitions would certainly be something that's used sparingly. And the nature of the medium would require them to be executed differently.

    I don't think the difficulty of getting visuals and sound right in a book has any weight on how "especially useful" they are or aren't. You do bring up a good point though that since the book is the oldest form of storytelling aside from oral tradition, that it sometimes may be the other way around in terms of which medium is the original influence.

    That also depends on the anime. I have found the storytelling of many anime movies / shows to be choppy too, but I would argue that Fate: stay night is very well paced, and only cuts abruptly from all-out action to very slow down-time for effect. This is also only one aspect of the anime medium; its "binge-ableness" I think is remarkable, and might be something to incorporate into a written story by paying careful attention to pacing and the ends of your chapters.

    I'd also like to mention that I'm not sure if it's so much "choppiness" as it is having to best utilize a ~20 minute space of time. Having an episode that's purely slow character development can leave one feeling like nothing exciting happened (which is different than nothing interesting happening), but 20 straight minutes of action would also be way too much. Balancing that in every ~20 minute episode, for 25+ episodes, is incredibly difficult I'd imagine. So one thing I've noticed is that a lot of action animes (I'll refer to Fate: stay night again here) like to reveal things about characters either mid-battle, or before / after a battle. It's efficient, and if done well it isn't jolting but rather flows together.

    I might add that I'm not purely interested in techniques that are unique to other entertainment mediums. That is to say, I am well aware that pacing is important in *any* storytelling medium; I believe that analyzing how it's done in another medium may give some new insights or refreshing ways of looking at things.

    It's led me to ask questions like: In what ways can chapters be structured in a similar way to anime episodes, and why (what would be the benefit)? How does a good anime structure its narrative in a way where the arcs all intertwine and weave together by means that feel natural but also not too predictably?
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2018
  10. Alex R. Encomienda

    Alex R. Encomienda Contributor Contributor

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    I listen to all kinds of music from progressive rock to blues and folk rock. One album in particular that interested me is Frances the Mute by The Mars Volta.

    It is a concept album about a young male prostitute who is looking for his mother and the way the music sounds is eerily and hauntingly effective. The vocals, the melodies and notes of the instruments all compliment each other to bring the sense and feel of what's going on in the concept.

    I try to make my work read the way the music tells that story. In other words, I'll be content if my work evokes the same feeling as the music of that album brings.
     
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  11. DeeDee

    DeeDee Senior Member

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    They are structured in exactly the same way ;)
     
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  12. Foxxx

    Foxxx The Debonair Contributor

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    What do you mean? Or, how? :)
     
  13. Some Guy

    Some Guy People-thing Supporter

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    I go from two girls screaming in a storm, to whistling and hollering from a crowd at a fighting match.

    Is that what you mean?
     
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  14. Carriage Return

    Carriage Return Member

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    OK, I'll take a stab at it and say that what you like about these well-crafted shows is how well they work together with each piece playing its part in harmony. I think the answer is that the shows were conceived-of holistically. One reason why Babylon 5 (a Western Sci-Fi TV show) was successful was that its creator conceived-of the whole story before it started and it then had a 5 year built in lifespan. It wasn't like a stupid half-baked thing like "Lost" where the writers were making stuff up as they went.

    Michelangelo looked at that piece of stone and saw David before he started with his chisel. That's why it is beautiful.

    Part of the beauty of anime is how they license all those light novels and stuff and have an endless source of creativity. They can come up with a a short or long season and really capture the work in question before moving on, unlike in America where a tired-ass horse of a show is run into the ground after being pieced together like Franknfuckingstein.

    Derail threat: I'm loving this season! (Goblin Slayer + Tensei Shitara Slime Datta Ken + Golden Kamuy (2nd cour) are making for one of the best seasons in quite some time!)
     
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  15. Some Guy

    Some Guy People-thing Supporter

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    o_O
     
  16. exweedfarmer

    exweedfarmer Senior Member

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    yeah but... Babylon 5 kinda sucked after the Shadow war....
     
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  17. Foxxx

    Foxxx The Debonair Contributor

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    Yes, that would be a solid example to demonstrate the point. :)

    ---

    @Carriage Return

    I'm still a sort-of newcomer to anime (I may not have gotten into it if I hadn't decided to see Your Name in theaters randomly one night) but I have seen the first few episodes of Goblin Slayer and I decided I'm going to wait until the season is finished and binge it. The new Steins;Gate and Attack on Titan (haven't started AoT at all yet, so no spoilers pls senpai) are currently on my watchlist, as well as the new movie in the Fate: Heaven's Feel series. Oh, and I want to watch Cowboy Bebop.

    In fact, I do consider myself a noob simply because I still have difficulty buying anime. I mean yeah, my friend shares his crunchyroll account with me and I know of a couple other places I can watch almost any anime I want for free, but when I find an anime I *really* like, I want to buy it. The first time I was surprised that Amazon didn't have something was when I went to buy an anime. Can't remember what it was now, but it happens quite often when I try to buy anime.

    Anyway, I like the "conceived-of holistically" concept. Winging a television show is such a bad idea. It's not like a rough draft of a novel where you can go back, edit, revise to your heart's content. Nope, that shit is on a tight, strict deadline and published straight away. It's no wonder that shows meander and drag on and the horse continues to be beaten after it's been beaten to death, or the show stops making sense and leaves you Lost, or have TWO HUNDRED episodes of filler like Naruto after the story was finished lol.

    You say that Michelangelo saw David in the stone before he started. I don't know if he did or not but I certainly believe it. What do you see when you go to write a story and look at the "stone" you're going to be carving, so to speak? What would holistically-conceiving a novel look like?
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018 at 2:52 AM
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  18. Carriage Return

    Carriage Return Member

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    Well, maybe “see” was a wrong word choice. How about feel? I know I sound like a contradiction asserting on one hand that I am a “pantser” and then saying that novels and TV series need to be “conceived-of holistically” in another.

    Maybe one vision would better describe what I mean? I’m going to be the strongest advocate on this board or elsewhere for the sanctity of the individual artist. I hate shows by committee, or books by committee wherein the author tries to please someone other than his authentic self.

    I’m not saying here that a show couldn’t have a staff of writers and producers and still be successful/good, just that those working in concert on it would have to share in a singular vision for the product to potentially work (for me).

    Does any of this make any sense? I’m not sure it even makes sense to me.

    P.S. I’m something of an old schooler when it comes to anime. If you tell me the sort of things you like I might can recommend some stuff. Cowboy Bebop is great (one of the only shows I can watch dubbed without my head hurting). I started out with sci-fi myself way back in the original “Dirty Pair” days and moved through Bubblegum Crisis to Slayers and now watch most anything but shonen (with the recent exception of Food Wars and Akame ga Kill). If you can get in touch with your feminine side there have been some amazing josei shows lately as well. If you like fantasy, one of the stop-everything-and-watch-without-blinking shows that came out semi recently was Ronja, The Robber’s Daughter by Ghibli.
     
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  19. Foxxx

    Foxxx The Debonair Contributor

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    I'm so new to anime I don't really know the terminology or anything like that. :p

    I don't like shows such as Naruto or Dragon Ball Z. The first anime I was ever exposed to was when I was very little, I would stay up past my bad time until Adult Swim started and Inuyasha would come on. I had no idea what the Hell was happening but it was terrifying yet transfixing at the same time. I've thought about going back and watching it every now and then. Anyway, my tastes tend to be eclectic and - admittedly - highbrow. I treasure Makoto Shinkai's "Your Name", and I've seen some of his other work: The Garden of Words and 5 Centimeters Per Second. The animation style is incredibly beautiful. I've also really enjoyed Fate Zero and Fate: stay night. My dirty anime secret is watching Scum's Wish and liking it. Steins;Gate is amazing as well, and I think next on my list is Steins;Gate Zero. I don't read manga or play any of the games though.

    Maybe I'm not as hardcore as some anime viewers but it doesn't matter to me if its dubbed or subbed unless the voice acting is noticeably bad. I can understand not enjoying dubbed movies because their mouths literally don't match what's being said and I find that very distracting and takes me out of the immersion, but in anime it makes no difference for me. However, I do admit that if I watch an anime in Japanese, I can't then go watch the English dub, and vice versa. Whichever language I watch first is the one I stick with. That being said, it's good to know the dub for Cowboy Bebop is good! I can't wait. :-D

    What are your favorites?

    ---

    I tend to be a mix of pantser and plotter when it comes to writing. I finished reading a book today. It had nothing to do with writing but the author mentioned an advice that had been given to her, which was something to the effect of only writing a book if it'd be impossible for you not to. That is, write it only if you HAVE to, not just because you'd like to / want to. I have plenty of ideas, often too many, but the ones that stick around and "haunt" me are the best ones that I need to do justice. I shouldn't even say they're *my* ideas. They come to me but I agree with Carl Jung that ideas have people, not the other way around. It's what we do with them that is in our control.

    What you say about having a single vision makes total sense to me. I get what you're saying. In journalism we call this the angle. This is even critically important outside of artistic or writing endeavors; take starting a business for example, and Simon Sinek's books about "finding your why". Regarding advocating for the sanctity of the individual artist, this is sometimes why I don't get involved in discussions of marketing on here, because it can fall into selling out on the integrity of the story and / or its author. It can be difficult balancing making a living with artistic expression, but I guess its just my choice to value the latter over the former, even though getting published and selling it is still very important.

    The same book I read today ("The Defining Decade" by Meg Jay) also mentioned John Irving very briefly, in a quote about how he starts from the ending and works backwards. I don't really have a set formula myself - maybe I will at some point in the future - so when I first look at the stone sometimes I see the beginning, sometimes I see the end, sometimes somewhere in the middle. But I think for one of the few novels that's been incubating in my head for almost a year now, I'm going to try starting from the end and working backwards and see what happens. Why in the Hell not? :)
     
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  20. Carriage Return

    Carriage Return Member

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    Oh if you like beautiful art and animation you should check out some of Kyoani’s (Kyoto Animation) stuff. They just had a great but utterly incomplete show that really showcases their artistic power:



    By “utterly incomplete” they didn’t explore even remotely the possibilities of the story, but the art makes you not even care. LOL They clipped the whole thing, and while I didn’t read the light novel that spawned the show, surely there was more going on than got put on the screen…

    For more complete shows of theirs that rock (some literally):

    K-On! (my favorite)







    Hyouka



    Chunnibyou

    Ahh, and who could forget the Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

    I could go on. Two other outfits that often put out good stuff are MadHouse and JC Staff…

    If you like high Epic historical fantasy I highly recommend Fushigi Yugi

    I also recommend all the stuff in my previous post of course. For someone relatively new to anime you have a literal treasure trove at your disposal I can’t even imagine where to start with the recommendations.

    “Shonen” is anime for boys (I call it “shonen junk” in a play on the serial pulp rag Shonen Jump in Japan where some of the big stuff in the genre originates.)

    “Shojo” is anime for girls but has a ton of stuff that might be of interest to you

    Ookami Shojo and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDEH_7jNrSE

    Ao Haru Ride are good representatives here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32dgEs0IDaM

    “Josei” is women’s anime, sort of New Adult for women

    Sakura Quest, and Kimi wa Petto ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bywvuLFJFNU ) are representative here (the latter wasn’t actually an anime but was an amazing manga and live action series (rare if you can find this, do! Imagine a story setup where a young fellow turns up on a young working woman's doorstep in the rain in a pineapple box )

    “Seinen” is sort of the mirror of “josei”. Here you’ll find a lot of slice of life stuff that appeals more to young men. You’d probably like a lot here especially if Naruto and its sort don’t appeal to you. This is also where moe (Moe-aaay) lives, which is a genre in itself. ;)

    Like you, I wouldn’t be caught dead watching Naruto or Dragonball or anything like that so we probably have a lot in common.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018 at 4:25 PM
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  21. Carriage Return

    Carriage Return Member

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    I love this, and wholeheartedly agree.

    I just finished writing such a book, which is why I struggle to avoid taking form rejections personally. I don't mind if some readers don't end up caring for it; in fact, it was designed at the outset to appeal to some and not to others. At this point, what offends me is the multilevel gatekeeping--the unmitigated gall it must take to stand in front of a market and say, "because I don't like it, you shall not pass".

    Oh, I'll be passing, one way or another, to pitch my book on the pyramid with the others deemed unworthy--some scorned, some ignored, some illegible, some simply buried under the rest to be discovered later, or not.

    It's not my fault that decisions of culture have been centralized and must now come from the capital instead of the districts.

    It's not my fault that the "big howevermany" publishers keep eating the smaller ones at the ultimate expense of creativity and diversity of expression.
     
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  22. Foxxx

    Foxxx The Debonair Contributor

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    @Carriage Return

    Do you have any idea where I can find (as in, watch or purchase) Violet Evergarden? I don't understand why I have such trouble finding anime lol. I think it might be on Netflix but I don't have an account to verify that. Holy Hell it looks amazing. And I guess a movie with a whole new story is supposed to come out sometime in 2020.

    Man oh man, there's just too much to watch. Some of your suggestions interested me, especially Hyouka which I'd heard of before but had forgotten about. I didn't know about all the different genres, so thanks for the explanations. I guess I sort of just watch whatever I like without caring too much about genre (although I do like some genres or styles more than others). That being said, you're right that I enjoy slice of life anime. I don't know what categories Steins;Gate or the Fate series would be under, but they definitely seem to be strictly for more of an 18+ audience.

    There's Cowboy Bebop, Samurai Champloo, Akame Ga Kill, Attack on Titan, Death Note, A Certain Magical Index, A Certain Scientific Railgun, Psycho Pass, Ghost in the Shell... I need to get started or else my watchlist is going to become as long as my reading list.

    ---

    Yeah, one of the issues I'm running into right now is genre. I don't want to corner myself into a genre because I've written everything from horror to sci-fi to romance t0 action and adventure. It always confused me how the gatekeepers you speak of act as if a writer starts the writing process by wondering, "Hmm. What genre do I want to write?" I don't know about you, but I just start with the story first, and then later on I run into the issue of trying to figure out what damn genre it could be marketed as. And as far as audience goes, I write for myself. Trying to write for other people just isn't a good idea in my opinion; it's a fruitless endeavor because you cannot please everybody or meet their expectations.

    I dread the publishing process but I won't worry about that until I'm actually ready to try and cross the Delaware River.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018 at 4:48 AM
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  23. John Calligan

    John Calligan Contributor Contributor

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    I'm 99% sure I watched the first episode of Violet Evergarden the other day on Netflix.
     
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  24. Carriage Return

    Carriage Return Member

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    Absolutely! Story uber alles.

    Now for something that's really gonna get your goat: tons of agents now are actually asking for "genre blending" right upfront in their wish lists, but when you explore this further you discover that what sounds, at first, like broad openness/acceptance is really a rather narrow definition of the concept. Actually that's being disingenuous of me; they know what genre blending is, but they only want certain genres blended in certain ways. So, the message is: get your head out of the stars dear writer, the possibilities aren't nearly as endless as you can imagine.

    Of course, it's not the agent's fault, she's only telling you what she can sell to the editors, and it's not the editor's fault, there's the marching orders from the publisher and trends and whatnot to consider. It's nobodies fault, really, right?

    And so we soldier on, with the occasional story breaking through from "nowhere", and all the wise owls left analyzing it after the fact for clues as to why the reading public found it so compelling. The author's answer, however, is always the same: "I wrote it for me."
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018 at 1:19 PM
  25. Carriage Return

    Carriage Return Member

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    @Foxxx

    Yeah, I think John is right. Netflix has somehow gotten their hooks in Violet Evergarden-san.

    These are the nightmare years, I'm afraid. Way back in the day there were very very few anime licensed here in the west. What did us otaku do with ourselves? We watched fansubs--vibrant communities that developed at conventions and shared old VHS tapes of amateur subs. Later, DVDs and the early internet helped with this, and then torrents and whatnot appeared. Now a hodgepodge is developing similar to western shows where you'll have different anime scattered all over, behind all manner of paywalls. I actually like crunchyroll for the fact that they are consolidating it somewhat, but when they can't get everything in one place it becomes a problem... (the paywall isn't the problem so much as the "I'm not signing up for this, this, this and this all at $19.99/month!!!)

    My solution would be here in the 21st damned century to slap a local ad in place of the Japanese TV add slot and air it near concurrently (like crunchyroll, really), but crunchyroll doesn't deserve a monopoly any more than anyone else. The only reason I like them is at least it keeps it from being more fractured. And then you get outfits like Funimation that license shows for disk release but then sit on the title for over a year or more. I guess the culture defense team would have a problem with "TBS America" (That's Tokyo Broadcasting, not Turner) or something, but what else the heck is cable for?

    I'm afraid the answer to your hard question of where to find these different shows (some of them old) is wherever you can.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018 at 1:16 PM
    John Calligan likes this.

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