1. Coldste

    Coldste New Member

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    Trying to get back into writing

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Coldste, Sep 4, 2018.

    Ok I haven’t wrote properly for ages and I want to get back to writing again, I have lots of stories I want to rewrite since they where all my first attempts at writing, but whenever I go to write I find myself just looking at either a blank page or writing a few words then deleting it. Any advice on how I can get my writing back? Cheers in advance
     
  2. Shenanigator

    Shenanigator Not a Fucking Doormat Contributor

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    It depends on whether you're a planner who writes from an outline, or if you're a discovery writer who just writes. I'm a discovery writer (ETA so for me, plot comes from the emotions of the characters, rather than casting characters for a predetermined plot), so my method would be to focus on what emotions I want to bring out of the characters and focus on editing one chapter at a time or one paragraph at a time. Staring at a blank page when I have pages to work from is a no-go.
     
  3. nycoma

    nycoma Active Member

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    open a new document and start writing about anything, whatever comes to your head. it will look like the desperate scratchings of a madman at first, but later you start catching real thoughts as they come.
     
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  4. GlitterRain7

    GlitterRain7 Galaxy Girl Contributor

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    You have to accept that you probably won't feel 100% happy with what you write at first. You just have to keep writing, though. And then you need to remember that you'll go back and make it something you're more happy with during revision.
     
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  5. Siberian

    Siberian Member

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    Try imitating the writing of your favorite scenes in books by rewriting it word for word or maybe adding your own spin on a character, scene, plot point, etc.. As you do that maybe your brain will start to come up with ideas for you to write on your own.
     
  6. ChickenFreak

    ChickenFreak Contributor Contributor

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    My advice. No telling if it will work for you.

    1) Start with something other than fiction. A blog, a journal, even a pen pal. Nonfiction is usually, IMO, translating rough language to smoother language. Fiction is translating pictures and sounds and smells and feelings to language. Much harder. IMO. So start with just writing.

    2) Accept, embrace, that your writing as you get started won’t be good.

    3) Especially the fiction.

    4) Try to practice one thing at a time. Plot plus character plus senses plus dialogue plus theme plus an ending is a LOT. Pick just a few. I spent a while writing headless-dialogue conversations. They were good for breaking the barrier to writing fiction.

    5) Another barrier, for me, was broken by forcing myself to finish NaNoWriMo. I don’t ever need to do it again, probably, but forcing myself to spew out words at high speed somehow got my fiction writing machinery running.

    6) For me, fiction writing is iterative. I write junk and I revise and revise and revise. I do this at the scene level. Others do it at the whole-novel level. But the first draft is just raw ingredients. Stop deleting it—you don’t throw away the pound of butter and bag of flour just because they’re not cookies yet, right?
     
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  7. mykl ruby

    mykl ruby New Member

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    Brilliant suggestion.do this myself sometimes and it helps
     
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  8. Spirit of seasons

    Spirit of seasons Active Member

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    I always forget to turn off spell check and auto correct. Do a super rough sketch of a scene in your head or on paper then figure out the steps you need to take to make that happen. First drafts are meant to look like steaming piles so don’t worry about grammar, just get the ideas down and keep the plot or story going.
     
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  9. peachalulu

    peachalulu Member Reviewer Contributor

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    I wouldn't try going back to an old story. Unless they've been plaguing at you, they can sometimes be hard to get into that mind frame of what you were thinking about when you wrote them. You might have lost the connection to them. Happens to me.
    I'd start with a fresh idea, use music, a picture, or a phrase to inspire you -- try even one of our contests -- I wrote a few of my favorite stories just because of the contests on here.
    Don't overthink it either. I usually write because it's something I want to read and that's how I produce my best work.
     
  10. Matt E

    Matt E Ruler of the planet Omicron Persei 8 Supporter

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    Maybe try listening to a podcast like Writing Excuses? Not just one episode, but as many as you can. Immerse yourself in it. Think about writing, and about what you want to write about. Start developing ideas. Then sit down and write, even if it sucks at first. You can always revise it later.
     
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  11. Hackworksubleis

    Hackworksubleis New Member

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    Another technique is also to not write. Just think about your story whilst doing other chores (for me, doing the dishes or taking a shower really works well and it sometimes unlocks that writer's block, which doesn't exist, by the way, writer's block is just our mind telling us that we're going at it from the wrong angle).

    Keep a notebook with you at all times to take notes when inspiration hits (or use an app on your phone, like Keep, to write down notes).

    Use the Pomodoro technique : block all the other apps and social media on your computer and set a timer for 25 minutes and write non stop (kind of like the automatic writing technique described by a fellow forum member). Write, no matter what comes out. Then, when the timer rings, read what you've written and see that pearl you can extract from all those words. I bet that after a few writing sessions, you'll want to keep writing even after your timer rings. :)

    Try and enroll in a creative writing class. I know a very good website, WritersHQ, that provides a "14 days to make a good writing habit" class, but I think I'm not allowed to link other sites here so I guess you'll have to use Google for that.

    Good luck!

    (I'm also trying to write regularly again, by the way, and it's quite hard with a full schedule.)
     

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