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  1. Marius Av

    Marius Av New Member

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    Two archetypes - the sarcastic and the ridiculous

    Discussion in 'Character Development' started by Marius Av, Aug 13, 2017.

    When I began to write four years ago (I was 12), the people liked my short stories just enough to want to "participate" in them. That was the time when I wrote a sarcastic character, one which always doubts the ideas of others and makes fun of a ridiculous character.

    They are not exactly against each other. It's just that the sarcastic one can't stand hearing him. He also is the pessimistic, criticizing the characters and their ideas. Very hard to trick. Again, this is his personality, not that he is just a dick. He fully supports the protagonists.

    On the other hand, the ridiculous character is acting just how I named it. He doesn't know too much, but his replies are very funny and laughable. He doesn't contribute to the plot (I mean, he can't help with vital informations, muscle and any other things). Even so, he is taking part of all the adventures because the protagonists think he is a valuable friend, after all.

    I plan to design such characters for my next novel, but I don't know how to make them work. I mean, I don't write humour, so that should be a little hard for me. I will try to get used to it.

    Do you think those archetypes have some weaknesses in entertaining the readers? There's something you don't like about them?

    Thank you.
     
    jannert likes this.
  2. mashers

    mashers Contributing Member Contributor Community Volunteer

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    I think if all they were was sarcastic or ridiculous all the time, then it would become tiresome and I personally would find the characters annoying. But if there are reasons why they act the way they do, and if those characteristics are part of a more complex personality, then I don’t see a problem.
     
    Marius Av likes this.
  3. jannert

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    @Marius Av - It worries me a little bit that you're referring to your characters as 'archetypes.' Maybe you should concentrate more on making them into 'real' people instead. Even model them on people you actually know. Would a sarcastic person ALWAYS say something sarcastic? Never say anything serious, or empathetic or kind? I know many people who can be very sarcastic, but none who are always so. It's in the moments when they're not being sarcastic that you get a glimpse of what fuels their cynicism. Same with the foolish person, who might, on occasion, come out with a remark that's very insightful or helpful.

    I'm with @mashers on this. I would get fed up reading a story made up simply of archetypes, unless it's a fable or some cautionary tale like that. However, I do enjoy sarcasm, when it's appropriate, and within the character of a real person. (Not so fond of the foolish ones, but there you go....)

    One of the tricks to 'designing' a character is to watch how this character plays off the other characters. And go with what you see.
     
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  4. Marius Av

    Marius Av New Member

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    Sorry for this. I think I used the "archetype" term where the "character" term does fit. I use archetypes as a start from scratch when i need to, then build my characters based on the informations from archetypes and my imagination. I know I should not have rushed the topic without looking over it.

    Thank you for the advices.
     
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