What Are You Reading Now.

Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by Writing Forums Staff, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. Vince Higgins

    Vince Higgins New Member

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    The Trial, Kafka. Very difficult. The first paragraph is three pages long. The author also does not break paragraphs for dialog. I am nearly through it, but only because I am not a quitter.
     
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  2. Kenosha Kid

    Kenosha Kid Member

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    Just finished Elena Ferrari's My Brilliant Friend. Absolutely loved it. She writes simply but beautifully, and all of the characters are lifelike, I feel like ive met them. Can't wait to read the rest of the quartet.
     
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  3. Meldini

    Meldini New Member

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    In the middle of reading The Written World by Martin Pucher which is a history of writing and would be fascinating for any writer. About half way through and finding it interesting and stimulating.
     
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  4. NobodySpecial

    NobodySpecial Senior Member

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    I took the John Grisham let down back to the library and traded for michael Koryta's 'The Prophet'.
     
  5. dbesim

    dbesim Senior Member

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    I finished ATMOM and got to the part about the penguins. I see what you mean. What horrifying beasts! Utterly beyond imagination. I had to chuckle. I actually find penguins really funny. I think it’s because of the way they walk. He, he.

    The most impressive thing about ATMOM was the mountain being bigger than the size of Everest. I thought, wow, that’s really re-writing things as we accept them. I have since read the Shadow of Innsmouth and I liked the story-line a lot more. I realise there’s a predictability about his writing and to expect those monster/devil/aliens/Cthulhu (whatever they are) in most of his stories. I know they’re always behind it. I wonder if he was trying to tell us something about them? Uh, oh.. Hope you never meet one, you’ll be eternally cursed! :eek:
     
  6. Ankita Sharma

    Ankita Sharma New Member

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    Dhoop ka Parcham By Dr. Hari Om
     
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  7. Adenosine Triphosphate

    Adenosine Triphosphate Old Scratch Contributor

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    Just finished On Writing by Stephen King.
     
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  8. Vince Higgins

    Vince Higgins New Member

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    Finished Kafka's The Trial. Now have a reading list, part of which comes from this thread.

    Giovanni's Room-James Baldwin*
    Invisible Man-Ralph Ellison.
    Silent Spring-Rachel Carson*
    At the Mountains of Madness- H. P. Lovecraft,
    On Writing-Stephen King

    The starred ones constitute research for current projects.

    Invisible Man I had read excerpts from and gave it to my nephew, also an aspiring writer, a few years ago. Over the holidays he mentioned it to me, assuming I had actually read it. Oh, shit. I'd better get on it.
     
  9. Krispee

    Krispee Senior Member

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    Reading the first in the Southern Reach trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer.
     
  10. Orihalcon

    Orihalcon Senior Member

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    I see a few people are reading On Writing by Stephen King. I've only read Salem's Lot, and it was good because it did put me in a scared, tense mood, but I can't say I enjoyed the prose. The book was also a tad long-winded ... Those of you reading On Writing, what do you think of it and of King's writing?

    I'm reading The Woman in the Dunes by Kobo Abe and some of H.C. Andersen's fairytales. The latter are difficult to read because there used to be a toddler in my life I keep thinking of when I read them, and it makes me miss them.
     

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