What Are You Reading Now.

Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by Writing Forums Staff, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. Seven Crowns

    Seven Crowns Contributor Contributor

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    yep, TBR = to be read.

    Now I'm on to Updike's "Rabbit is Rich" and I can already tell you it's a 5 star book. Perfect dialog. Deeply flawed characters. Stuff I love! It takes place during the US stagflation years, and the setting is expertly realized. If there is an aspect of Updike's "Rabbit" books (there's four of them) that's intimidating, it's that the setting is elaborate. Some people hate that, I know. But when it's done with great skill, I don't have a problem with it. Now that I'm on vacation, I'm going to try to read 100 pages a day. Let's see if I can do it. (I'll be lucky to finish 50, haha!)

    You know, I always wonder at books like these that hit the opening pages perfectly. Just the first paragraph or two is usually enough to know that the story will hold. I think it has to do with the authentic authorial voice. It can sound many different ways, but you'll always recognize when it is (or isn't) there. I suppose you have to be in the target audience. Obviously this book can't possibly work for everyone. As a writer though, the trick is to get that authenticity into your own work. It's easier to say it than to do it.
     
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  2. thirdwind

    thirdwind Member Contest Administrator Supporter Reviewer Contributor

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    Updike has been on my to read list for over a decade now. I just never got around to reading him. But from everything I've read about his works (including your post here) tells me he's a fantastic writer and that I shouldn't delay reading his works, starting with the Rabbit novels of course.
     
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  3. Krispee

    Krispee Contributor Contributor

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    But also the ending, getting that right, after all that amazing work if you don't hit the ending right...
     
  4. More

    More Active Member

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    Just finished J G Ballard's autobiography The Miracles of Life . It is a book that divides you own opinions . On the one hand , if you know anything about Ballard , you don't learn much that is new . It is also in need of an editor , it bobs backward and forwards in places and has some repetition. On the other hand , It is a moving account of an interesting and good person and the last thing written by a dying writer.
     
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  5. Natifix

    Natifix Banned

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    I am currently reading Becoming Supernatural by Dr. Joe Dispenza. It is about training the brain to communicate with the body on a subconscious level, to reprogram damaged DNA which helps to overcome degradation among other things like health issues, mental clarity, or intuition etc . . . Also helps with grounding and meditation work, energy work too.
     
  6. Cave Troll

    Cave Troll It's Coffee O'clock everywhere. Contributor

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    Into Part 2 Chapter 5 of The Damnation Game, by Clive Barker.
    Had to stop reading Rama II, cause it was all dialogue and no
    get to the alien craft.
     
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  7. Friedrich Kugelschreiber

    Friedrich Kugelschreiber oike despatio Contributor

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    The Prime Minister by Anthony Trollope. Very good so far.
     
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  8. Vanna Heller

    Vanna Heller Member

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    I am currently reading Dear Edward, by Ann Napolitano. It tells the story of a 12-year-old boy who is the sole survivor of a plane crash that kills all of the other 191 passengers, including Edward's family. It's interesting enough to keep my attention for awhile.
     
  9. Krispee

    Krispee Contributor Contributor

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    Anyone read the Shattered Sea trilogy by Joe Abercrombie?
     
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  10. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

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    I'm really enjoying Pastoralia by George Saunders. Anyone else a fan of his work?
     
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  11. Historical Science

    Historical Science Contributor Contributor

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    I had to read CivilWarLand in Bad Decline for school this semester. Like most short story collections, it was hit or miss for me. There were some interesting ones in there for sure but at times it seemed like he was trying too hard to be funny.
     
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  12. dbesim

    dbesim Contributor Contributor

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    I’ve just finished reading The Sun Is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon.

    F142ECFD-2FAB-4AE5-B87C-CC20C2C323B6.jpeg

    It’s a YA about how destiny works its magic for two people who fall in love in a single day who’s struggles and approach to life couldn’t be any more different. There were a few interesting coincidences over the course of the story but there was much meaning and magic in their conversations. It also teaches that life doesn’t always follow the course that it’s meant to take. It’s an interesting read to pass the time.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2020
  13. deadrats

    deadrats Contributor Contributor

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    I'm just curious, but what was the class you had to read them for? To me, it sounds like that might have been a pretty cool class. I often read literary journals over collections, but I'm trying to incorporate reading more collections into by routine. I'm also reading the stories in order to see if that does anything different, you know, in the reading experience.

    Are there any collections you've read that were pretty much all hits? Just wondering if you have any suggestions. What about Jesus' Son by Denis Johnson? That's a good one that comes to mind for me. I do plan to reread in the near future since I've read every story but not in order. I have no idea if that means anything, reading these collections in order, but it's something I'm trying out. I mean the order must be somewhat important. It's the way the author delivers his or her work. I don't know why I tend to jump around, reading whatever catches my eye in the table of contents. I don't know if that matters at all. I'm stuck in the house with a small library. Saunders is pretty new to me. I've read a few stories before but this is the first time I am reading a collection of his.
     
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  14. dbesim

    dbesim Contributor Contributor

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    I just saw your question and I did, indeed, read that one (it was very good). I think the author’s target audience was aimed for a younger sector than his First Law Trilogy. There’s still a very convincing story-line, however, filled with fantasy, struggle and adventure. It won’t disappoint.
     
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  15. Krispee

    Krispee Contributor Contributor

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    Thank you, I know this isn't necessarily the right thread for a question like this but I also knew some here have read Abercrombie, myself included. I just haven't read that particular series. Sounds interesting; I'll have a closer look at it, especially with Christmas coming up.
     
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  16. Historical Science

    Historical Science Contributor Contributor

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    I'm getting my MFA in Creative Writing and my reading list was a collaboration with an advisor. Here's the list:

    • CivilWarLand in Bad Decline by George Saunders
    • Call me Ahab: A Short Story Collection by Anne Finger
    • No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
    • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
    • Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
    • The Plague by Albert Camus
    • The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen
    • On Writers and Writing by John Gardner
    • The Collected Stories by Grace Paley
    • David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
    • Oblivion: Stories by David Foster Wallace
    • One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez
    • Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges
    • Fox Tooth Heart: Stories by John McManus
    • Austerlitz by W. G. Sebald

    I have only read Train Dreams by Denis Johnson but I would be interested in reading more of his work. Train Dreams reminded me a lot of Cormac McCarthy. One short story collection that is coming to mind is The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury. That is a great collection and he is one of my favorite short story writers. He has written great novels but I think he really shines with his short stories.
     
  17. Homer Potvin

    Homer Potvin Get off my Balzac... Staff Contributor

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    Solitude and Old Men are two of my faves. Solomon is one of the few Morrisons I haven't, though.
     
  18. Lone Wanderer

    Lone Wanderer Member

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    I'm finally reading Dune! Figure its time to get ahead of the movie so I can be the snobby jackass who talks about how the book is so much better.
     
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  19. Krispee

    Krispee Contributor Contributor

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    The only thing with that is that it might make viewing the film more difficult. Dune's good though, best of his series.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2020
  20. Vanna Heller

    Vanna Heller Member

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    Haha, I'm always the one to say the book is better than the movie. It's true with any book, it's way better than the movie.
     
  21. EFMingo

    EFMingo A Modern Dinosaur Staff Contributor

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    It is though...

    Nope, this argument pops up in here every half year or so. I won't perpetuate it...

    Except Fight Club. I always disliked the book and thought the movie was better. Same with Cloud Atlas, though they are arguably different in structure so both are great in their own right.

    ...oh look, I perpetuated this nonsense again...
     
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  22. Vanna Heller

    Vanna Heller Member

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    I've never seen or read Fight Club or Cloud Atlas, but I trust your word.
     
  23. Vanna Heller

    Vanna Heller Member

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    But, I strongly dislike it when there is a book then they make a movie out of it because it's like they cut out the best parts of the book, and they add things that ruin the story. Plus I like details so I'm always going to read the book then watch the movie.
     
  24. jannert

    jannert Retired Mod Supporter Contributor

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    Barak Obama's The Promised Land. Very similar in tone to his other two books (which I also enjoyed.) He has definitely developed his writer's voice. He always takes a thoughtful look at what he has done—as all three books are autobiographical—and analyzes what has been happening around him. Interesting to read his take on so much of what I remembered about his presidency. I'm not very far into the book yet, though. It's the kind of book that you can pick up and put down, as time allows.
     
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  25. Krispee

    Krispee Contributor Contributor

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    David Suchet's Poirot is like that for me, only I put mine down about six months ago, haven't picked it up again. It is a little repetitive, in that he talks about his experiences on this programme, and then on that one. It's interesting but not captivating.
     
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