Tags:
  1. WaffleWhale

    WaffleWhale Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    195
    Likes Received:
    80

    What could cause a god to be banished from his own realm?

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by WaffleWhale, May 8, 2018.

    I'm writing a story where this guy, Simon, is the Grim Reaper. He's not an evil villain or anything, he's just basically the CEO of the underworld. Near the beginning of the story, he gets kicked out and sent to Earth. He then was to find his way back, because the guy who replaced him is an evil villain. He's releasing the dead back onto Earth and all kinds of crazy stupid stuff like that. My problem is, I have no idea how to get him kicked out. He's the leader down there, so I don't know who would kick him out or why. I can't find other things that are similar to go off of, either. In all the stories of gods becoming mortals, they aren't the king god. The king god usually kicks them out (Marvel's Thor movies, Rick Riordan's Trials of Apollo).

    Any ideas?
     
    John-Wayne likes this.
  2. Tenderiser

    Tenderiser Not a man or BayView

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2015
    Messages:
    7,546
    Likes Received:
    10,212
    Location:
    London, UK
    Seems pretty simple - Evil Villain engineered a coup because he was power hungry and thought Simon wasn't doing a good enough job as CEO. You'll always find people willing to follow someone like EV because they're power hungry but weak, because they can't say no, because they're afraid, because they're trouble makers, because they like seeing drama without being at the centre of it... the reasons go on and on.

    I don't know about the actual mechanics of how EV gets Simon out of the Underworld, because it depends on the rules you've made up for your world. I'm sure you can work something out. :)
     
  3. SethLoki

    SethLoki Retired Autodidact Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,482
    Likes Received:
    1,593
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    Grim Reapers, they have to go and grimly reap. While hooded skellybob and scythe is up top collecting souls, the evil scoundrel below seizes opportunity to sit in the empowering magic CEO chair. Sheriff Nottingham/Prince John stylee.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
    Linz and John-Wayne like this.
  4. Iain Aschendale

    Iain Aschendale Potatoes again? Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2015
    Messages:
    17,481
    Likes Received:
    33,452
    Location:
    Face down in the dirt
    Meet Joe Black, but when he got back after his vacation (yeah, I know Joe's vacation only took a fraction of his attention, but run with it) he discovered that his second in command had engineered a hostile takeover of Hades. Just need a bit of Bill Parrish and a bit of Joe, and you're golden.
     
    John-Wayne likes this.
  5. John-Wayne

    John-Wayne Madman Extradinor Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2017
    Messages:
    3,189
    Likes Received:
    4,978
    Location:
    Badlands
    And this is why my death put in place a warden of hell, LOL. Got to avoid those hostile takeovers.

    How about the devil tries to replace death so that he could come to Earth with his minion! So you can have like a shadow villain in the story, one that's behind the scenes controlling the strings of the visible villain!
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
    Iain Aschendale and SethLoki like this.
  6. soupcannon

    soupcannon Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2018
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    197
    Location:
    1. noun; the act or process of locating.
    For a comparative novel, I might suggest Sten Nadolny's The God of Impertinence.

    https://books.google.ca/books/about/The_God_of_Impertinence.html?id=4YjgAAAAMAAJ&redir_esc=y&hl=en

    "Apollo channel surfing, Hermes discovering french fries and the trickster god taming the gods of war" (The New York Times Book Review)The ancient gods are still among us! After 2,187 years in chains, Hermes -- the fun-loving god of stolen kisses, erotic freedom, turmoil, and thievery -- is freed. He soon sets out to resurrect the long-forgotten virtues of curiosity, imagination, humor...and mischief.Finding the modern age strange and confusing, Hermes catches up with the cultural changes of the last two millenniums by tapping the minds of everyone from graffiti artists to brain specialists. He soon learns that disempowered Zeus has retired to play golf in Missouri and that Hephaestus, the neurotic and cranky god of volcanoes, is plotting the demise of gods and mankind alike. Hermes needs all the impertinence and roguery he can muster for the game of divine poker that will decide the fate of the world, in this swift and amusing fable for the end of the millennium."

    If you rpremise is that he's the CEo of the underworld... even a CEO is answerable to shareholders. Basically, he's the chief driving force, but if his actions disrupt, or are seen to endanger, the business of underworlding, he can be removed. This can be engineered by his competitors, or just be the result of his vision for the company continuing to skew farther from the perceived best direction that the board feels the underworld must take.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice