1. lady_augusta

    lady_augusta New Member

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    What should my characters call themselves?

    Discussion in 'Character Development' started by lady_augusta, Aug 6, 2019.

    Hi all. I'm really hoping this is the right forum for this, but if it's not, please point me to the right one and I will go there instead! Thanks.

    I'm embarking on a Regency (well, it's late Georgian, but Regency is more evocative of the genre) romance series in which the main characters of each of the five novels are five female friends who all find companionship in one another despite their wildly different circumstances and abilities. It so happens that the year in which the series takes place is all of their first social season, and all of them feel underprepared or reluctant for a variety of reasons—Deliverance is a polymath who would rather pursue her studies in physics; Rita has spent the last decade living without discipline in Italy with her father and his mistress; Alodia's noble great-uncle is forcing her to participate in high society with the hope of marrying her to one of her cousins. You understand.

    Upon all becoming friends, the girls decide to call their friendship group something, owing to the fact that while they will have lots of 'friends' during the social season, the five of them are going to be true friends to one another and provide some solace from the rather cutthroat world of society. Part of the reason they have to do this is because the name of their group is what I want to call the series.

    But I'm really drawing a blank for any names. The only one I can come up with is 'The First Season Society', which I think sounds very dumb. Anyone got less dumb sounding ideas? Or at this point, any ideas. :) thanks.
     
  2. Lawless

    Lawless Active Member

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    One thing you can do is take a word from a language like Latin or Italian or French (or maybe even Irish?) and twist it a little bit so that it sounds cool in English and is suitable as the name of a group like that.

    Many European student organizations take their names from Latin, such as a sorority in my country that calls itself Amicitia. (That's Latin for "friendship".)

    If this makes sense to you, you can use Google Translate to find words and then play around with them. The name doesn't need to be grammatical as long its general meaning will be intuitively understandable to native English speakers.

    Another idea, more along the lines of "provide some solace from the rather cutthroat world" is to find an expression that contains words that contradict each other in a cool and feminine way, such as A Fortress of Kindness.
     
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  3. Hammer

    Hammer Senior Member

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    How about some play on the word debutante? The Tantes or the Debs? Or use the "friends of" to suggest a closer knit group - Friends of Deborah to get the deb bit in? (as "friends of Dorothy" became slang for gay men who would meet and ask innocent questions like "do you know Dorothy?" when homosexual acts were a crime)

    Or get a knights/nights pun in for the suggestion of forthcoming nuptials? The knights of the long sword? ...Ladies of the Knight?
     
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  4. lady_augusta

    lady_augusta New Member

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    Thank you! I have noticed that a lot of book series in the genre have a one 'descriptive' word for a group; the other day I noticed a series 'The Bastion Club' to describe a group of men who are a 'bastion' of bachelorhood despite everyone else marrying around them. I've been playing around friendship words but none of them quite fit...maybe another language would help. Thanks!
     
  5. lady_augusta

    lady_augusta New Member

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    Puns are always fun, that's a good idea! Especially for Regency books (my life changed the day I saw a book called 'Some Like It Scot' but I digress). I'm not sure about debutantes cause the word postdates the story but I like the pun idea, even if it's only a pun as an inside joke to their circle...
     
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  6. Mish

    Mish Member

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    Sounds like the name is very important since this is what you want to call the series.

    What are their standout features? What are their common traits and interests that bind them together? What do they enjoy doing together the most? (I think in the answers to these questions you will find the name by which the group would like to be known)
     
  7. Hammer

    Hammer Senior Member

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    According to "Google Ngrams", the word debutante came into use slap bang in the Regency period so a lively group of gels could easily be early adopters/initiators but I give you right - it does sound more C20 and you don't want readers to have to think about such details!
     

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