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  1. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Contributor

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    When someone receives "notice..."

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Steerpike, Jan 4, 2017.

    ...such as through legal service, for example, have they been "noticed" or "notified?"
     
  2. ChickenFreak

    ChickenFreak Contributing Member Contributor

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    I would've assumed "served."
     
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  3. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Contributor

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    Yeah, that was my first thought. But I'm editing language in an agreement that refers to everything in terms of "notice," so I thought I might stay consistent by using a variation on that term. I hear litigation attorneys in the office talking about having "noticed" an opposing party (meaning they served notice), but I think that may just be slang, in which case I don't want to use it. I actually have "served" as a place holder. Maybe I'll just leave it that way. I think the meaning is certainly clear.
     
  4. ChickenFreak

    ChickenFreak Contributing Member Contributor

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    Maybe flip the grammar so you can use "received notice"?
     
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  5. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Contributor

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    That would work, but I'm leaning toward just using served. It's already such a wordy clause--goes on for almost half a page--that I hate to use three words (party who received notice) when one would do (party served).

    Thanks, CF!
     

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