1. Malisky
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    Malisky Fuzz Overdriver Contributor

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    Adoption question

    Discussion in 'Research' started by Malisky, Aug 8, 2016.

    What happens if the parents traveled to let's say... India, to adopt a child (because it's easier to give you a child), then return back home and after a couple of years they regret it and want to put the child back in system services again? Let's say that they are just ass-holes and they charge the child with extreme violent behavior (while the kid is alright). RAD I think is the latest trend.

    I'm interested in listening opinions from different places. America, England, Finland... wherever you are from, is fine. I tried to research it but I haven't found a satisfactory conclusion.
     
  2. Ben414
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    Ben414 Contributing Member Contributor

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    My job involves working with local and state human/social service agencies in child welfare, so my in-depth knowledge is with the U.S. system. However, the answers can be generally extrapolated to other countries like England and Finland.

    1) Parents can't charge their children with anything. What they can do is request assistance from their local human/social service agency. However, that gets me to #2:
    2) Even if they say the kid is violent, the agency isn't just going to take the child away. Agencies have realized removal should be avoided whenever possible, and they would first try to help the family with whatever issues they were going through.
    3) A more likely option is that the parents would try to re-home the child. You should get plenty of information of that if you google "adoption" and "re-home."
     
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  3. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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  4. Malisky
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    Malisky Fuzz Overdriver Contributor

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    Thank you for your time and info. :)

    2) How? Are they psychologists? Sociologists? How do they determine what should be done? If the parents are insisting of annulling the adoption, how can they even be considered fit themselves to be parents? What happens to the child in the in-between process?

    I think that it's the first article I read, but it leaves me confused as relation to the method that was conducted. If the child was adopted from Russia and was destined to live in America, weren't there procedures beforehand in order to change his citizenship into an American one? I read somewhere that the citizenship of the child changes (right or did I get that wrong)? So why would the parents send the child back to Russia? Why didn't they contact their local services? What would they benefit out of it?

    Furthermore, if a child is seen as having violent behavior, what happens to it afterwards? How do the services proceed?
     
  5. Ben414
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    Ben414 Contributing Member Contributor

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    They're social workers. If one was going to break it down into traditional academic disciplines, most of their training involves psychology and health science.

    The process is complicated. A prevention/support case would be opened, the assigned social worker would visit the child and family in their home, talk to the child, talk to the family, talk to relevant collaterals (e.g. pediatrician, teacher, etc.), and could schedule any number of things to support the family. If the family requested it, the process would be entirely voluntarily and the parents could refuse any of it. However, if the worker suspected the family of abuse or neglect, an investigation could be opened which could lead the way to a forced process. The details vary from state to state, and it would take quite a bit of independent reading on your own to understand it well. Here's a good website that has tons of sources on every aspect of it: https://www.childwelfare.gov/

    I wasn't even aware adoptions could be annulled (google tells me it's very rare), but that requires a judge to agree to it and I can't imagine a judge agreeing to an annulment in this situation.

    Child welfare isn't supposed to determine if the parents are good--they are only supposed to determine if the parents are minimally sufficient as to keep the child safe.
    If the parents couldn't or refused to provide a safe environment, then the child could be removed. However, parents blatantly trying to hurt or neglect their kid so he can be taken away could face issues in criminal law (child welfare is civil law).

    In-between, the child would probably stay in the home. The child would only be removed if the home wasn't safe.
     
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  6. Malisky
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    Malisky Fuzz Overdriver Contributor

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    Thanks.
     
  7. theamorset
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    theamorset Contributing Member

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    India is pretty much out of international adoptions.
     

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