1. revyb
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    revyb New Member

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    Air Medical Crew

    Discussion in 'Research' started by revyb, Feb 21, 2014.

    Hi everyone!

    I am writing a choose your own adventure format tutorial for air medical crewmembers to learn about aviation terminology and regulations. It has to be realistic and non-hokey, but I also have to make it engaging. The hardest part thus far has been creating realistic scenarios. I was wondering if anyone here knows anything about air medical crews and could tell me about a "day in the life" of someone who flies in helicopters or planes to save lives. I mainly need to know what kinds of conversations are carried on, if any, what interactions you have with the pilot, and what issues or problems typically occur that need to be dealt with.

    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    sorry to seem dense, but why would you be writing a 'tutorial' dealing with subjects you know nothing about?

    do you have substantial practical experience in anything to do with such situations?
     
  3. revyb
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    revyb New Member

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    It's my job. I'm a technical writer. I have a lot of manuals, articles, and technical information in front of me and that is usually what we use to write our content. However, my boss has asked for something more practical and interactive, so this is one of several places I am looking for someone willing to supply me with information. And yes, I am also looking about on forums for air medical folk, as well as e-mailing groups. Responses have been sparse.

    But thank you for the warm welcome. -_-
     
  4. jazzabel
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    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

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    Unfortunately, the topic you're wanting info on is quite specialised. I'm a doctor, and I once knew a guy who worked with 'Flying Doctors' in Australia, but most of the info I could offer would be guessing. And I'm the only doctor here. So I think you really need to get in touch with your local air ambulance service, explain what you're doing and perhaps they'll be able to help you? Because it sounds like you need relevant, up to date info, so you need reliable sources. Best of luck with the project, it sounds interesting :)
     
  5. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    Hi welcome to the forum. My sister-in-law (sadly now deceased) flew as a nurse with the Royal Flying Doctor Service in Australia. Typically they flew into rural areas to provide medical care rather than emergency evacuations. There is a similar system in Alaska.

    Emergency evacuations are a different animal.

    I'll tell you about my one and only emergency flight from Craig Colorado over the Rockies to Denver with a cardiac patient.

    It probably won't be like the flights you are writing for. It was a local pilot rather than an emergency flight crew.

    So here's the story, the winds were picking up and the pilot said they had to go. The nurse that was scheduled to go on the flight was too far away. I volunteered. Next thing I know the doctor is handing me emergency drugs and equipment which I, as a brand new nurse not too long out of school thought, oh dear, it was just me and the patient. The pilot was busy flying the plane. The back and passenger seats were removed and the patient was on a stretcher. I was just loose in the back with him, no seat belt. I am guessing that is not normal nowadays. This was in the late 70s.

    He rested, I made sure his IV and O2 were functioning, the flight was bumpy and the landing was exciting. The pilot let me know how one lands a very small plane with a strong sidewind. He tilted the plane literally to a 45 degree angle and only leveled it out just before we touched down.

    Going back was fun, no more patient to worry about.

    I do spend a bit of time with EMS workers and I'd bet that the ride in an aide unit is very similar to the ride in an air unit. You might have a premature infant in an incubator or a patient one is doing CPR on during the flight. Or maybe just a serious trauma case, they need IV fluids, broken bones stabilized, bleeding managed.

    Patients might vomit, or crash (meaning lose their blood pressure) and you'd need to take emergency measures with drugs and IV lines.

    For a pediatric patient these days if you cannot get a line in, you stick a needle right into the bone marrow where it is an open cavity blood flows through. Intraosseous Access

    A cardiac patient needs O2, IV lines and an EKG monitor. Most very ill patients will have cardiac monitors, and typically an O2 saturation monitor.

    So, consider the same things you'd see in an EMS setting except the vehicle is flying. People would often be busy in flight, socializing happens on the way back and when they are in quarters waiting for a call. It's kind of sit around then frantic activity then sit around some more.
     

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