1. Dallas Winston
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    Dallas Winston New Member

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    Apostrophe for "it" regarding possession

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Dallas Winston, Sep 8, 2008.

    This has been bugging me.

    After researching half-heartedly, the conclusion I've drawn is that there is no "rule", just to pick a style and stay consistent.

    Example: The sun was shining brightly; it's (its?) reflection could be seen by all.


    I seem to be using this type of phrase rather often in a novel I just started. Opinions please!

    P.S. I'm an idiot as it pertains to the "rules" of grammar, so you can call me that or treat me that way. It might actually be more fun that way.
     
  2. CDRW
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    CDRW Contributing Member Contributor

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    Its is posession. It's is a contraction of "It is."
     
  3. Dallas Winston
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    Dallas Winston New Member

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    Thanks, and again, bear with me...

    so in that circumstance, using "it's" for possession is flat-out "wrong" according to the "rules"?

    Wouldn't "the sun's light" be correct for possession? If so, why wouldn't "it's" be okay?
     
  4. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Nouns and pronound have different rules. The pronouns have possessive forms that do not contain an apostrophe. Several pronouns also participate in contractions with "is", and these require an apostrophe before the s

    Nouns, on the other hand, normally form the possessive by appending 's, although some nouns which end in s form the possessive by appending only an apostrophe.

    Current usage allows (nearly?) all nouns ending in s to also form the possessive by appending 's (James's brother as an alternative to James' brother).

    But the rule for pronouns is firm. Most but not all have a distinct possessive from that does not contain an apostrophe, ever:
    its
    hers
    his
    ours
    while certain others form them the same way as nouns:
    anyone's
    someone's
    everybody's
     
  5. Dallas Winston
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    Dallas Winston New Member

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    A sincere thanks to you for that detailed explanation. That makes perfect sense, if only I knew what a "pronoun" was?

    Just kidding. My Word spellchecker is laughing in my face right now for all the times I cursed technology for incorrectly putting that squiggly red line underneath "it's" in my rough draft.

    Best wishes, friend.
     

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