1. Jane Baker
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    Jane Baker New Member

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    Are there other Regency/Victorian fans here?

    Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by Jane Baker, Dec 31, 2011.

    I'm new to the forum and am very fond of novels such as Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters wrote. In fact, my favorite book of all time is Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. I've read it four times and each time is more enjoyable than the first. But I also love Jane Austen's novels(excepting Persuasion, I must confess), and am wondering if others here are fans of hers as well?
     
  2. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    Hi I use to be a fan or so I thought.
    Jane Eyre is one of the first I have ever watched then read.
    The book is never the same again if you do it in the order I did it.
     
  3. Lemex
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    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

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    Jane Eyre is a fine novel. I've read it twice, and still enjoy thinking about it. I love the Bronte sister's work, and Austin's novels are - while not the best of that Romantic/early Victorian era - are hugely entertaining, and they put me into this relaxed world that is almost Arcadian. It's more escapism than anything else for me, but I love it.
     
  4. Jane Baker
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    Jane Baker New Member

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    I read the book first, hated it, then watched the Masterpiece Theater version and loved it, so I read the book again and found the humor that I was too young to see before. Why didn't you like the book?
     
  5. Jane Baker
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    Jane Baker New Member

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    What other novels/writers of the era do you recommend?
     
  6. Lemex
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    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

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    Anything by Thomas Hardy or George Eliot. And then there is the big one: Charles Dickens. I haven't read all of Dickens, but he's overrated. Good, and very worth reading, but overrated.
     
  7. prettyprettyprettygood
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    prettyprettyprettygood Active Member

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    For Regency period, have you read any Georgette Heyer novels? I love them, perfect escapism, might be worth looking at :)
     
  8. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    Nothing wrong with the book.
    It just that I saw the film first and so when I try to read the book it was nothing like the film and so I did not appreciate it as much.
     
  9. Jane Baker
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    Jane Baker New Member

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    I've been considering George Eliot. What would be a good book of his(or was it a woman going by a synonym?) to start with?

    I also have yet to read any Dickens. It's so shameful, I know. But a lot of novels are so lengthy! I'll get around to him one of these days. :)
     
  10. Jane Baker
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    Jane Baker New Member

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    I haven't, no. I can't say that I've heard of her. I'll look into her though. Thanks for the recommendation.
     
  11. Jane Baker
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    Jane Baker New Member

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    I see. :)
     
  12. Lemex
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    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

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    George Eliot's real name was Mary Anne Evens.

    During the time the reading public were funny about woman writers: Jane Austin first published under the tag 'By a Lady' and Frankenstein became the success it is when the reading public found out about Mary Shelley and her connection with Lord Byron. I think one reviewer wrote something like 'For a man it would have been just good, for a woman it is extra-ordinary'. Mary Shelly openly herself mocked this review in an Author's Introduction to the book, making me think that if I had been alive in her day I'd have asked for her hand in marriage.

    Any of the novels published under the name George Eliot are worth reading, but I myself started with Silas Marner.

    Dickens is a lot of fun, but he's one of those writers: his reputation is more well known than his work.
     
  13. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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  14. Lemex
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    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

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    Why did you quote my entire post just so you could disagree with my opinion of Dickens?
     
  15. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    It was a mistake..I thought it was obvious because I quoted Dickens separately.
     
  16. Eunoia
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    Eunoia Contributing Member Contributor

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    Shamefully, I haven't actually finished reading a Bronte nor an Austen novel. I got about a third way through Jane Eyre, was really enjoying it, but then I started reading something else and I've just not got round to going back to it. I've tried reading Pride and Prejudice a few times but I just can't get into it for some reason. It's a shame because I've seen TV/film adaptations of it and loved it, as well as the rest of Austen's novels, and I really want to enjoy reading it. I am attracted to the period though, just the mannerisms and the romanticism of it all, even the harsh lifestyles and poverty.

    I don't think it's fair to judge an author on TV/film adaptations as they can sometimes be very different. (Apologies if you have actually read some of Dickens' work)

    I like how Dickens portrays gritty Victorian life. Admittedly, I've only read Great Expectations by him (must really get around to reading more of his novels) which I thought was great at the start but then it sort of dwindled to him just becoming a gentleman.
     
  17. Lemex
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    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

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    Dickens is very good, and as Orwell shows in his essay Charles Dickens, a lot of Dickens' power comes from his middle-class objectivity. He knew how the rich and the poor lived, and while being able to criticize and make fun of both he does not give any way to improve the situation. Dickens was happy to sit back and examine all levels of society while showing no political, national or ideological bias, which makes him universal.

    Also, Dickens liked to add small, almost pointless details into his writing that really made the scene come to life.
     
  18. Jane Baker
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    Jane Baker New Member

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    Right. I thought as much.

    Bravo! I enjoyed this comment. :)

    It's interesting that you praise 'George Eliot' so highly. Until just last month I had never heard of him(or her, rather), I am ashamed to admit. Seeing as you reside in England, I feel that you are a safe judge of English literature and will take your advice and read George Eliot as soon as possible. :)

    I see. I have only seen movie or television adaptations of his works, namely movie versions of Nicholas Nickelby and A Christmas Carol(of which my favorite is The Muppet Christmas Carol), a musical version of Oliver Twist, and a BBC adaptation of Our Mutual Friend, which I enjoyed immensely. I have yet to actually read any Dickens.
     
  19. Jane Baker
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    Jane Baker New Member

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    *gasp* To start a Bronte or Austen novel, and then not finish it is unfathomable to me. lol. Admittedly, my most recent venture to read Wuthering Heights produced a very intense desire, around the 3/4 mark, for the novel to end. But when it did I was satisfied. Jane Eyre is much longer, but since it is my favorite book in all the world, I enjoy its length.

    Jane Austen's novels are lengthy as well, but not as dark and gloomy, so I don't often notice their length.

    This happened to me with Pride and Prejudice as well. I saw the A&E version and, when I went to read the book, found myself a bit bored. Sense and Sensibility and Emma were far more in depth and interesting than the movies, and I loved the movies.
     

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