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Pick a book for January

Poll closed Dec 10, 2008.
  1. Caves of Steel by Isaac Asimov

    3 vote(s)
    42.9%
  2. The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory

    1 vote(s)
    14.3%
  3. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Wicked by Gregory Maguire

    3 vote(s)
    42.9%
  5. The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. The Freshmaker
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    The Freshmaker <insert obscure pop culture reference> Contributor

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    BOTM January Voting

    Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by The Freshmaker, Dec 3, 2008.

    Choose the book that you would most like to read for the month of January.

    Caves of Steel by Isaac Asimov
    A millennium into the future two advancements have altered the course of human history: the colonization of the galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain. Isaac Asimov's Robot novels chronicle the unlikely partnership between a New York City detective and a humanoid robot who must learn to work together. Like most people left behind on an over-populated Earth, New York City police detective Elijah Baley had little love for either the arrogant Spacers or their robotic companions. But when a prominent Spacer is murdered under mysterious circumstances, Baley is ordered to the Outer Worlds to help track down the killer. The relationship between Life and his Spacer superiors, who distrusted all Earthmen, was strained from the start. Then he learned that they had assigned him a partner: R. Daneel Olivaw. Worst of all was that the "R" stood for robot--and his positronic partner was made in the image and likeness of the murder victim!

    The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory
    Before Henry VIII ever considered making Anne Boleyn his wife, her older sister, Mary, was his mistress. Historical novelist Gregory (Virgin Earth) uses the perspective of this "other Boleyn girl" to reveal the rivalries and intrigues swirling through England. The sisters and their brother George were raised with one goal: to advance the Howard family's interests, especially against the Seymours. So when Mary catches the king's fancy, her family orders her to abandon the husband they had chosen. She bears Henry two children, including a son, but Anne's desire to be queen drives her with ruthless intensity, alienating family and foes. As Henry grows more desperate for a legitimate son and Anne strives to replace Catherine as queen, the social fabric weakens. Mary abandons court life to live with a new husband and her children in the countryside, but love and duty bring her back to Anne time and again. We share Mary's helplessness as Anne loses favor, and everyone abandons her amid accusations of adultery, incest, and witchcraft. Even the Boleyn parents won't intervene for their children. Gregory captures not only the dalliances of court but the panorama of political and religious clashes throughout Europe. She controls a complicated narrative and dozens of characters without faltering, in a novel sure to please public library fans of historical fiction.

    Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen
    Though he may not speak of them, the memories still dwell inside Jacob Jankowski's ninety-something-year-old mind. Memories of himself as a young man, tossed by fate onto a rickety train that was home to the Benzini Brothers Most Spectacular Show On Earth. Memories of a world filled with freaks and clowns, and with wonder and pain and anger and passion; a world with its own narrow, irrational rules, its own way of life, and it's own way of death. The world of the circus: to Jacob, it was both salvation and a living hell. Jacob was there because his luck had run out--orphaned and penniless, he had no direction until he landed on this locomotive "ship of fools." It was the early part of the Great Depression, and everyone in this third-rate circus was lucky to have a job at all. Marlena, the star of the equestrian act, was there because she fell in love with the wrong man, a handsome circus boss with a wide mean streak. And Rosie the elephant was there because she was the great gray hope, the new act that was going to be the salvation of the circus; the only problem was, Rosie didn't have an act--in fact, she couldn't even follow instructions. The bond that grew between this unlikely trio was one of love and trust, and ultimately, it was their only hope for survival. Surprising, poignant, and funny, Water for Elephants is that rare novel with a story so engrossing, one is reluctant to put it down; with characters so engaging, they continue to live long after the last page has been turned; with a world built of wonder, a world so real that one starts to breathe its air.

    Wicked by Gregory Maguire
    When Dorothy triumphed over the Wicked Witch of the West in Frank L. Baum's classic tale, we only heard her side of the story. But what of her arch-nemesis, the mysterious Witch? Where did she come from? How did she become so wicked? And what is the true nature of evil? Gregory Maguire creates a fantasy world so rich and so vivid that we will never look at Oz the same way again. Wicked is about a world where Animals struggle to be treated as first-class citizens, Munchkinlanders seek the comfort of middle-class stability, and the Tin Man becomes a victim of domestic violence. And then there is the little green-skinned girl named Elphaba who will grow up to become the infamous Wicked Witch of the West, a smart, prickly, and misunderstood creature who challenges all the preconceived notions about the nature of good and evil.

    The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
    Though more than sixty years have passed since this remarkable novel won the Pulitzer Prize, it has retained its popularity and become one of the great modern classics. "I can only write what I know, and I know nothing but China, having always lived there," wrote Pearl Buck. In The Good Earth she presents a graphic view of a China when the last emperor reigned and the vast political and social upheavals of the twentieth century were but distant rumblings for the ordinary people. This moving, classic story of the honest farmer Wang Lung and his selfless wife O-lan is must reading for those who would fully appreciate the sweeping changes that have occurred in the lives of the Chinese people during this century. Nobel Prize winner Pearl S. Buck traces the whole cycle of life: its terrors, its passions, its ambitions and rewards. Her brilliant novel -- beloved by millions of readers -- is a universal tale of the destiny of man.
     
  2. The Freshmaker
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    The Freshmaker <insert obscure pop culture reference> Contributor

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    One more day on this. Get your votes in.
     
  3. marina
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    marina Contributing Member Contributor

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    Caves of Steel is under 300 pages. That's a win right there. :D
     

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