1. katews
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    katews New Member

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    Business End of Writing: Submissions

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by katews, Jun 5, 2013.

    When you feel that what you've written is ready to be submitted, how do you prefer to do your submissions? I know that the Internet has made submissions so easy... simply attach to email.

    *But* I have to say that when I started writing, it was send your manuscript with SASE and wait for a reply... and I'll admit that I kind of miss that when I submit via email now. There's just something exciting about sending out a stack of manuscripts and then getting a check (hopefully!!) in the mailbox. Uh... or a rejection letter, but I won't think about that with this thread. :D The instant gratification of email doesn't feel as good sometimes.

    Which form of submission do you prefer, and for what reasons? (If you're new to writing, I'm not talking about that very long ago relatively, either... periodicals didn't widely allow email submissions for the most part until a few years ago.)
     
  2. erebh
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    erebh Contributing Member Contributor

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    Ha , I wrote my first book in 92ish (pre internet anyway), had no idea about how to get something published so I printed off about 30 copies of my 400 odd page MS and posted them off without so much as a QL. In my naivety I expected them all to race for my signature and all It did was cost me a fortune in paper, postage and printer ink but you are right. I waited by my post box everyday with baited breath and wasn't disappointed when 30 letters came back to me over a 2-3 week period, was devastated however when they were all rejection letters - would I rather an email telling me politely to go away and annoy somebody else? Not sure but it's a helluva lot cheaper!
     
  3. katews
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    katews New Member

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    Erebh, your post brought back some memories I've been trying to suppress. :) I did the same thing... worked myself into a panic worrying about how I'd break the news to the second and third place that accepted... how would I tell them that they're too late and I already sold the piece? (arrogant much?! hehe... nah, just very naive and totally uninformed!)

    You wanna talk about masochism? I KEPT all of my rejection letters... and still have them. I could build a bonfire. :redface: But then I have acceptance letters, too, and photos of checks/payments, so it all balanced out.

    I'll admit that a "get out of my face and don't darken my magazine's doorstep again" email would be less painful and forgotten about more rapidly!
     
  4. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Check your market's website and follow their submission instructions. Makes it easy!
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    ANY form the agents/publshers/publishing venues i hope will accept my work want it in!

    the reasons should be obvious...
     
  6. thewordsmith
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    thewordsmith Contributing Member Contributor

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    Nowadays, most agents prefer electronic submissions; however, you may still find many who say either/or, or they expressly state they will accept ONLY postal submissions.

    One of the quickest ways to get a rejection is to act opposed to the agent's requested form of submission. Choose the agents you wish to target for submissions, research their websites to determine if they even represent the type/genre you are ready to pitch, weed out those who do not and, of those who are still in the running, check to determine just how they prefer submissions to be sent. THAT will determine how you will send submissions. And that is how I prefer to submit.
     
  7. GriffinGarcon
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    GriffinGarcon Member

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    Guys, isn't there such thing as Amazon publishing your stuff online for free for 10 days (see if people download your book), then starting to charge for it, and see if people download your book?

    Can i post a link here?
    Ok, here is this woman, how self-published on amazon:
    http://news.yahoo.com/texas-woman-self-publishes-hits-182850961.html

    What do you guys think about that?
    I thought that was cool.
    The publishing houses then sit there like lions in the ambush, watch whose book got on top of the rating, and then pounce at you with a contract!!!
    That's a dramatic way of putting it :) :) :)

    Regards,
    Griffin
     
  8. ChickenFreak
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    ChickenFreak Contributing Member Contributor

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    It sounds like you're thinking of this as a way to submit your work. But it isn't. Publishers rarely like to publish work that's already been published somewhere else, so by doing this you've essentially "used up" your work - you can't change your mind, "unpublish" it, and then go back to the traditional method. The work's chances are gone. It's sort of like taking a bite out of a cookie and then trying to sell the rest.

    Sure, if it's the world's greatest cookie, tons better than every other cookie on the market, you might be able to sell that gnawed-on fragment. Similarly, if your self-published book does incredibly, _incredibly_ well, you might be able to sell it to a publisher. But the odds are against you.
     
  9. GriffinGarcon
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    GriffinGarcon Member

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    Yes, i was thinking of it as a way to submit my work... Too naive? Well, that's why i'm here. Better safe than sorry! :).H-mmm... Never thought of it the way you described! Thanks!
     

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