1. T.Trian
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    T.Trian Overly Pompous Bastard Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Calling Latin Speakers: fio para bellator

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by T.Trian, Oct 15, 2015.

    Does the sentence "fio para bellator" translate into "be the prepared warrior" (or "be a prepared warrior")?

    @KaTrian and I checked the Wiktionary, and it looks like "para" (being second person singular present active imperative) and "bellator" (warrior/soldier) would be correct, but we're not sure whether "fio" (be prepared, be done, to become etc.) is correct.

    Also, should the article be definite or indefinite? Or is that only deciphered through context?

    Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. BrianIff
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    BrianIff I'm so piano, a bad punctuator. Contributor

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    @Lemex will likely be here in about ten hours. I see him online before I go to work. He's studied it, and is getting into Ancient Greek.
     
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  3. T.Trian
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    T.Trian Overly Pompous Bastard Staff Supporter Contributor

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    @BrianIff, thanks for the heads up!
     
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  4. Lemex
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    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

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    Depends entirely on which one you want. And also depends on if you want 'Be the' or 'be a'. If it is 'be the' then it should be definite, 'be a' does not refer to something specific.

    Fio might be the wrong word. 'fio' in that sentence- and this is the reason many people's copies of Latin grammar are well-worn and withered - translates to something like 'I become' or 'I am a prepared warrior' - the indefinite would be I suppose the same but in a much less concrete term - if that makes any sense at all. In concrete English terms it's something like 'I am an example of a prepared warrior'.

    I think if you wanted to say it as a sort of motto, 'be the prepared warrior', you'd have "fi para bellator' with the word 'fi' being the active present imperative in the second person. Actually, 'fi' covers most active singular imperatives I think - will have to check that. Or if you want the second person, active, indicative plural, in the sense of something like 'you should be' - go with 'fītis para bellator' - it depends on exactly what tone you want to say the sentence in, or how you want it interpreted by the hearer/reader.
     
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  5. KaTrian
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    KaTrian A foolish little beast. Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Thanks @Lemex :)

    Fio para bellator is one of those warrior slogans you see on martial arts apparel and somesuch. As we have a character in our story who's into that kind of stuff, we wanted to make sure we know if the phrase he uses actually makes sense or not (if not, one of the brainier characters could point this out) -- it's quite common for foreign expressions to enter the English language with errors, after all. :p
     
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  6. Lemex
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    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

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    No problem. ^^ Always happy to help with Latine?
     
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  7. ADreamer
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    ADreamer Banned Sock-Puppet

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    Fio - essentially means be made something. It is more often than not applied as "become" something. It depends on the way it is used though - fio is rather a basic word.

    In the most basic examples (which are not exactly accurate as it depends on the context of the statement): fio miles - become a soldier. fio argentarius - become a silversmith. Now if I was referring to someone a more accurate verbiage would be factus miles - he became / be made a soldier. If I included a name Samuel factus miles it becomes - Samuel became / be made a knight (or soldier).

    As mentioned Latin is tricky.



    Why not fieri? It is an imperfect verb for to be able / to become / to be made so sexuality and context is not as confining as it is for perfect verbiage.

    fieri para bellator pretty much means, in a rather literal sense: to become/be made prepared fighting man/soldier.


    I mean fio is the wrong verbiage for the sentence.


    fitis isn't right either - it is more related to facio. Facio covers a related concept, however, the verb wouldn't be accurate for the sentence. I mean it'd run more along the lines of I do or I give than anything. The I is amplified. facio para bellator - I become / I prepare if anything, apparently double checking fitis is a plural so they become / they prepare.


    But then as the saying goes, my Latin is a little "rusty".



    As for the t-shirt, the people who did it most likely used google translate. It's simple, easy and anyone curious can use it. Fio para bellator by google is to become a warrior [sounds more "enticing" than a prepared warrior/solider]
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2015
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  8. Lemex
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    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

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    ^Great post @ADreamer.
     

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