Tags:
  1. dillseed
    Offline

    dillseed Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2013
    Messages:
    390
    Likes Received:
    19

    Chicago Manual of Style -- Height and Weight

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by dillseed, Apr 10, 2014.

    The Chicago Manual of Style uses this example: He is five feet ten inches tall (no commas).

    However, they do not show examples of height and weight as compound modifiers before nouns. If you're familiar with Chicago style, do you think that the following are punctuated correctly per their style?

    a five-foot-ten-inch man (Not: a five-foot, ten-inch man.)
    The newborn weighed seven pounds eleven ounces. (Not: seven pounds, eleven ounces [I think].)
    a seven-pound-eleven-ounce newborn (Not: a seven-pound, eleven-ounce baby [I think].)

    Any feedback is deeply and greatly appreciated.

    ~ds~
     
  2. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,891
    Location:
    Boston
    I think there actually is a comma (i.e., "seven-pound, eleven-ounce newborn"), but I'll have to check.
     
  3. dillseed
    Offline

    dillseed Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2013
    Messages:
    390
    Likes Received:
    19
    Thank you. I own the current edition, and it's not in there.
     
  4. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    keep in mind that while the CMS can be helpful in some areas, is not a bible for writers, is aimed at editors and publishers... nor does it lay down the law for all publishers' house style... it's not a viable substitute for a good punctuation guide...
     
  5. dillseed
    Offline

    dillseed Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2013
    Messages:
    390
    Likes Received:
    19
    Thank you, mammamaia.

    What's a good punctuation guide (in your opinion)?
     
  6. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,891
    Location:
    Boston
    Well, I couldn't find anything in grammar guides. I just did a Google search on various examples of compound modifiers and found no consensus. Some people use hyphens between all the words, some do it like I did, and some omit the comma.

    Now that I think about it, I've seen phrases like "six-and-a-half-foot man," which makes me think that perhaps using hyphens is the way to go. At this point my advice would be to rephrase it or, at the very least, be consistent throughout the manuscript.
     
  7. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
  8. dillseed
    Offline

    dillseed Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2013
    Messages:
    390
    Likes Received:
    19
    The venerable New Yorker uses hyphens throughout height and weight measurements when they serve as adjectival modifiers:

    a six-foot-eleven-inch man
    a nineteen-pound-four-ounce carp

    five feet ten inches tall
    ten pounds six sounces
    (No commas are used by the New Yorker in any of the aforementioned examples.)

    This is a meticulously edited publication, so I'll adhere to these forms (should I ever encounter them in my writing). :)

    Thank you.
     
  9. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,891
    Location:
    Boston
    One thing to keep in mind is that places like the New Yorker have certain in-house rules that they follow. When possible, a grammar guide should be the first place you look.
     
  10. dillseed
    Offline

    dillseed Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2013
    Messages:
    390
    Likes Received:
    19
    Much obliged.
     
  11. minstrel
    Offline

    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    8,723
    Likes Received:
    4,821
    Location:
    Near Los Angeles
    Also, the New Yorker's in-house rules are kind of quirky. For example, it's the only magazine I read that insists on umlauts in words like "reënter" and "coöperate."
     
  12. dillseed
    Offline

    dillseed Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2013
    Messages:
    390
    Likes Received:
    19
    Yeah, those (the diaereses) were probably popular during the Pony Express. They look like emoticons when placed above the vowels. I think they look silly.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  13. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    can't say i've ever noticed that in 7 decades of perusing the ny'r... but, since it's due to those words having doubled consonants and the need to pronounce each one, i can see why they insist on it, since i use it as well [wherever i can] with my name, in which all three consonants are pronounced...

    so, the 'proper' way to show my name is with the umlaut over the 'i'...
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
  14. minstrel
    Offline

    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    8,723
    Likes Received:
    4,821
    Location:
    Near Los Angeles
    I always thought your name was pronounced MY-ah. I guess I'm wrong.
     
  15. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    that's ok, you're forgiven...

    actually pronounced 'mah-ee-ah'... it's a greek name [eldest of the pleiades, daughter of atlas, granddaughter of gaia] and a greek word meaning 'great mother/little mother/midwife' and 'witch'[!]
     
    minstrel likes this.

Share This Page