1. AnarchicQ
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    AnarchicQ Member

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    Editing and publishing

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by AnarchicQ, Dec 29, 2008.

    I have a completed manuscript and it's currently being edited. 8 chapters out of 29 have been edited. The work is over 70,000 words.
    Is it alright to submit to a publisher now? Or shall I wait until the whole thing is edited?
    I presume I should wait, but I'm antsy.
     
  2. Anne Wayman
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    Anne Wayman New Member

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    If you're submitting the whole ms, then wait... but if you've got a proposal, maybe it's time to submit that.

    A
     
  3. RomanticRose
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    RomanticRose Active Member

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    Just consider what you will do if in 2 weeks you get a request for the whole manuscript. What will you tell them? Oops?

    That short of a turn around time is rare, but does occasionally happen.
     
  4. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    the 'send' advice re a proposal would only be a good idea if it's a non-fiction book, imo...

    for a novel, you'd better have the whole thing completed and polished to a faretheewell before querying!
     
  5. Show
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    Show Contributing Member Contributor

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    I haven't been published but if I were you, I'd play it safe and get it thoroughly edited before even thinking of sending it to a publisher. You don't want them to just throw it out over a few grammar mistakes. So just make sure that there are none.
     
  6. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    AnarchicQ,

    Wait. Finish your work.

    Depending on who you submit to agent/publisher directly, you'll need to write and polish a query letter, cover letter with first three chapters+synopsis, synopsis+full manuscript, or maybe some other combination.

    So after you finish editing, you'll have at least a query letter or synopsis to consider. There are many writers who would rather write another novel than tackle a synopsis.

    Sure, the submission process takes time. But while that's going on, you can be working on your next project. Besides, it is better to do it correctly and to the best of your ability, as with each market you'll only get one shot with the project. There isn't a: "I wasn't really read yet. I call do-over!" policy bouncing around the publishing business. ;)

    Terry
     
  7. b.rice
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    b.rice Member

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    I've noticed a lot of conversation pertaining to publishing, but not so much in regards to editing and agents. Should I hire an agent, where do I find one? Or should I hire an editor first? I am still in the beginning process and this is all new to me so forgive me. I've spoken with people who are in the gaming industry and they have suggested POD for the first writings. How are your feelings about that? Any information would be greatly appreciated. :confused:
     
  8. NaCl
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    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

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    You can "hire" an editor simply by paying one to look over your work. Plan on paying $500-700 for a complete edit...and check the credentials of your editor before writing a check. I made the mistake of paying an "editor" and the result was not satisfactory. I should have done a better job of selecting a competent editor.

    As far as "hiring" an agent...uhhh, not quite sure how to phrase this, but here goes...you don't "hire" a literary agent. You get on your knees and beg the good ones to represent you. IF he or she agrees, it will be based on numerous factors above and beyond the quality of your pleading. The first criteria is the quality of your writing...is it professional? Then, if it meets that minimal standard, does she or he have a current need for a book in your genre? Wait...there's more...is the agent completely "booked up" with a stable full of producing writers? Assuming you get past all these barriers, then you sign a contract that sets the terms of payment. And your book still has not been seen yet by a single publisher! As you can see, there are considerable obstacles to overcome and that is the very reason why...as mammamaia puts it, "you'd better have the whole thing completed and polished to a faretheewell before querying."
     
  9. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    that about says it on the editor/agent issue... as for publishing, if your book isn't good enough for a paying publisher to take on, then pod-ing is your next best option... but all pod outfits are not equal, and some are downright gawdawful, so if you go that route, for pete's [and your] sake, check the firm out at p&e, first!

    http://www.invirtuo.cc/prededitors/
     
  10. b.rice
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    b.rice Member

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    Agent, Editing, Publishing

    Wow, that's alot to take in. I didn't realize how much work I would have to go through. Somebody forgot to mention that when he said "go ahead write a book"
    Being that we are siblings I might be able to get away with hurting him just a little bit or maybe alot! LOL.
    But on a serious note, thanks everyone for all the info.
     

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