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  1. dillseed
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    dillseed Active Member

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    From a journalistic standpoint

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by dillseed, Dec 23, 2014.

    I cannot rephrase. In lieu of the word "percent," could the percent symbol work in the two sentences below? Also, I don't think hyphens are needed for the phrasal adjectives, because the context is clear without them. And stylistically, I don't think the % sign needs to be used after 10 in the second example below. OK to the two examples below with the % sign and no hyphens?

    He said, "We expect a 10% a year increase in funding."

    Mr. Mulrooney said, "The figures represented a
    10-15% a year increase in funding."

    Thank you.
     
  2. ChickenFreak
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    ChickenFreak Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'm confused; why not use the word "percent"?

    I also feel that "ten percent a year" is ambiguous.
     
  3. daemon
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    daemon Contributing Member Contributor

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    Yup. Do you mean that funding is multiplied by 1.10 each year, or (if current funding = $1,000/year) that, each year, $100 is added to the annual funding?

    $1,000, $1,100, $1,210, #1,331, etc.

    vs.

    $1,000, $1,100, $1,200, $1,300, etc.
     
  4. Shadowfax
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    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

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    1/ I'm an accountant, so 10% seems fine to me. However, I'd rather see "per annum" than "a year"; if you're going to use one Latin phrase, why not use two?

    2/ As far as the ambiguity is concerned, I think the two following sentences are clear enough:

    He said, "We expect a 10% increase in funding over last year."

    He said, "We expect a 10% increase in funding year on year for the term of this government."

    3/ This sentence is nonsensical:
    Mr. Mulrooney said, "The figures represented a 10-15% a year increase in funding."

    because if I know what the figures are, I'd know what the increase was, I wouldn't need to give a range. i.e. if funding increased from £1,000 to £1,097, I'd know that the funding had increased by 9.7%, although I might round it t0 10%, or describe it as approximately 10%.

    I'm more likely to say:
    "We expect a 10-15% a year increase in funding."

    because the anticipated increase is an unknown.
     
  5. dillseed
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    dillseed Active Member

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    Thanks again to everyone.
     

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