1. Yobuba
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    Yobuba Member

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    Historical fiction

    Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by Yobuba, Jul 25, 2010.

    Anyone else a fan of Historical fiction?

    I recently read I Claudius and Claudius the God by Robert Graves. Both novels were fantastic and were a great mix of historical accuracy and fictional creativity.

    I also recently read Imperium and Lustrum by Robert Harris. Although probably not as factual as the Robert Graves novels, they were wildly entertaining all the same, and helped me to develop an interest in ancient Rome.

    Can anyone else recommend any really good historical fiction?:cool:
     
  2. Eunoia
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    Eunoia Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'm a fan of historical fiction. :D
    I like fiction based in the world wars, or based around slavery, or around King Arthur and stuff. It varies really, and rather depends on the book - I'm pretty open with historical fiction.
    I'm not sure what to recommend.. depends what you're into. :p
     
  3. RedRaven
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    RedRaven Active Member

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    Also a fan.
    Like Eunoia, world wars get my attention and the era of the industrial revolution.

    Based on the few titles you named, I'm suspecting your interest lay a bit further in time. I haven't explored that era myself.
     
  4. Lavarian
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    Lavarian Contributing Member Contributor

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    Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clark is a fantastic piece of historical fiction.
     
  5. Zieki
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    Zieki Member

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    Just finished reading The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara and thought it was wonderful. It's about the Battle of Gettysburg in the American Civil War. I thought it was a bit slow to start but it really picks up and the way Shaara writes is brilliant, in my opinion. You come to love each and every character that he writes about and, come the end, you're left nearly devistated by the loss of the Confederacy and somehow elated at the victory of the Union (depending on whose point of view you're reading at the time). Great read.
     
  6. dogboon
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    dogboon Member

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    I really enjoyed Bernard Cornwell's Azincourt. It was a shock to me when I discovered it, as only a week before I had decided to write the story of Azincourt in a fictional story based on what I knew and could glean from research. Then I walked into a high street book store and there it was. I was happy it was written by Bernard, I loved Sharpe's rifles.
    The story is the usual riveting and action pact character driven plots, with twisted scum-bag villains. Great account of the historical events, plenty to sink your teeth into. Unfortunately though it was a very happy ending. If this is somewhat confusing, read it and you'll know what I mean.
     
  7. Victorian girl
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    Victorian girl Member

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    It`s a long way from Rome I know but I have heard that `The remains of the day` is an enjoyable historical story, I love the film but haven`t read the book yet. I am about to order it.

    xx
     
  8. Mr_Swashbuckler
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    Mr_Swashbuckler Member

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    I enjoy a good historical novel myself. I tend to read a little further on in time then the Roman age. I’m a huge fan of Napoleonic History, particularly C.S Foresters Hornblower and Bernard Cornwell’s Sharpe. Forester and Cornwell offer two fantastic heroes who are surrounded by brilliant historical content.

    Recently I’ve Just finished the third novel in Tim Severin’s `Hector Lynch’ series.
    The Novels follow a somewhat maritime piratical theme. They cover everything you need in a good `swashbuckling’ adventure. The novels are fairly historically accurate, which is an added bonus as some of the titles being published today are a little far fetched.

    I’ve heard that Conn Iggulden’s novels are especially good. I’ve never read any of his work as yet but have friends who highly recommend him.
     
  9. Anonymouse33
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    Anonymouse33 Member

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    Does Don Quixote count? :D
     
  10. MShalna
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    MShalna New Member

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    I enjoy historical fiction, especially during the American Civil War era.

    I would recommend Gods and Generals,Killer Angels, and The Last Measure. A Civil War trilogy...
     
  11. jameskmonger
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    jameskmonger Member

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    I read a very good book a while back, based around the Celts and Romans. The name, if I remember rightly, was "City of Flames". I'm on my phone at the moment, so if someone can have a look and confirm that, I'd be very grateful.
     
  12. litchickuk
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    litchickuk Member

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    If its Victorian, then i've either read it, its not out yet or it hasnt been written yet! Im obessed with that era - i seriously believe i was born 150 years too late!
     
  13. litchickuk
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    litchickuk Member

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    But please dont make me finish 'The Crimson Petal and the White'! Ive been reading it for 4 years and am still only about 2/3 way through! I dont recommend it but lots of others do. Its all a matter of preference, is it not?
     
  14. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    I love them, I am not fussy about the time period, just a great story. I grew up reading Victoria Holt and I still love her creepy books lol my top four are:

    1) Mist Over Pendle by Robert Neill (Pendle Witches)
    2) Her Royal Destiny by Carol Maxwell Eady (Katharine Parr)
    3) Finishing School by Pamela Brown (Women in a Japanese POW camp)
    4) Mrs Shakespeare by Robert Nye (Why did Shakespeare leave his second best bed to his wife lol more graphic sex than I usually go for but I was gripped all the way through)
     
  15. Tessie
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    Tessie Contributing Member Contributor

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    @ Zeiki.

    Yeah, I've heard that was a really powerful book. I don't know very much about Shaara's son, though. Jeff Shaara's books on the American Revolution were actually disappointing. He does have a strong, captivating voice, and he can carry the reader's attention, but the two novels were badly portrayed and not well-grounded. His dialogue was not original to the time, and the main characters were not accurate to the historical record. It's such a shame. Anyone who attempts to write about that period should thoroughly study it first before writing.
     
  16. Tessie
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    Tessie Contributing Member Contributor

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    @ dogboon

    Is Cornwell's "Redcoat" any good? I'm thinking of reading it sometime.
     
  17. Aconite
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    Aconite Senior Member

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    Inglis Fletcher's books (American Revolutionary War era and surrounding--but in North Carolina, instead of the usual Massachusetts or Virginia) are well-written and well-grounded. They frequently appropriate historical characters, but ones of relatively little import or obvious personality from the historical record, so I'd lean closer to 'historical fiction' than 'historical docudrama' (so to speak) for the bulk of her works.
     

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