1. SethG
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    SethG Member

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    How do I show the plural of words as words without using italics or underlining in my examples below

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by SethG, Jun 24, 2016.

    Dear Experts,

    How do I show the plural of words as words without using italics or underlining in my examples below?

    I'm thinking single markers could be used (like the old typewriter days)...

    For example: 'is's, 'was',s, 'whereas's, 'ass's, 'thank-you's, 'maybe's, 'I love you's, 'how-to's, 'to-do's and 'not-to-do's

    Could all my examples above pass muster?

    I thank you for your time.

    Regards,

    Seth
     
  2. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    Those look horrible to me. I'd probably rewrite...

    There were sixteen instances of the word "is", two of the word "was" and seventy four of the word "ass". ​

    Or whatever.
     
  3. sahlmi
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    sahlmi Active Member

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    Laughing at myself. I misunderstood what you were asking and had the strangest, most embarrassing comment (now erased).
    But if you did go the route as in your examples, it would be better to put the word/phrase in full quotes: "is's" "was's" or go the simple route: no ifs ands or buts about it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2016
  4. izzybot
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    izzybot Human Disaster Contributor

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    I'd go with BayView's example, or something like "Thirteen examples of the following words: is, was, whereas" etc if you have enough to group them like that.

    If you absolutely have to format it like that, though, the single quotes do work. It's not very attractive, but it's functional, and if you're not writing prose I don't see any problem with it.
     
  5. SethG
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    SethG Member

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    Thank you both very much. I do prefer the look of the single quotes (e.g. ‘is’s instead of “is’s”).
     
  6. doggiedude
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    doggiedude Contributing Member

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    I had no clue what your examples meant until I read BayView's response.
    What context are you using these items? Is this a technical report or a piece of fiction?
     
  7. SethG
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    SethG Member

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    And could this work; i.e. put 'I do's in quotes like this?

    E.g.

    They said their 'I do's last Saturday.
     
  8. SethG
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    SethG Member

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    Definitely not fiction. Just general text.
     
  9. sahlmi
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    sahlmi Active Member

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    I would figure single quotes as incorrect unless you're from the UK. If you're using American quotes elsewhere and UK quotes for something like this, then I think you're being inconsistent. Obviously, if it's UK all around, then no problem.
     
  10. SethG
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    SethG Member

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    So does this look better?

    "is"s, "was"s, "whereas"s, "ass"s, "thank-you"s, "maybe"s, "I love you"s, "how-to"s, "to-do"s and "not-to-do"s
     
  11. sahlmi
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    sahlmi Active Member

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    No!!! haha. The word itself is in quotes, but you still need the single apostrophe for the plural. Please see my original reply example. It's not a matter of looks, it's a matter of grammar, consistency, and a publisher's house rules, which of course, trumps everything.
    Whether you use use single or double quotes, the entire word needs to be enclosed, not just the singular part of it as you have in both your first and the above example.
    Single quotes: 'was's' or 'is's'
    Double quotes: "was's" or "is's"
    But as stated, it's probably best to avoid either construction and reword.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2016
  12. SethG
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    SethG Member

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    Duh me! Uh doy! I'm stupid! Lol.

    So, would it be:

    “whereas’s”
    “I love you’s”
    “maybe’s”
    “and’s”
    “I do’s”
    “to-do’s”
    “how-to’s”

    By George, I think I've got it now! Do I? My last examples above look good?
     
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  13. SethG
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    SethG Member

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    And for letters as letters, could these below work?

    His “B’s” look like “8’s”.
    Her “W’s” look like “V’s”.
    Her lowercase “p’s” look like “q’s”.
     
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  14. sahlmi
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    sahlmi Active Member

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    Of course not stupid because you asked the question. But yes, you got it. But I don't think quotes are needed if there's no confusion: Mind your p's and q's.
    I don't even think the apostrophe is always needed either to make things more confusing: No ifs, ands, or buts about it.--as above.
    My personal way of viewing it is if there's no confusion, go simple and avoid all those ugly quotes and apostrophes. If there is a chance of confusion, then you have little choice--or re-word.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2016

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