Tags:
  1. Nicolle Evans
    Offline

    Nicolle Evans Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2016
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Oswestry, Shropshire

    How to use a "foreign/made up" word within your writing?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Nicolle Evans, Oct 9, 2016.

    My word: andenå

    Meaning: mind communication/silent speaking/mind thoughts etc

    Used: To describe to speech that cannot be heard out loud.

    That particular speech in my novel is written like this:

    : For example this cannot be heard.

    It entirely occupies it's own line, in italics, and is not used with any sort of speech punctuation.

    My query is about how to use the word when describing that speech process:

    eg. She used her andenå (I currently italise when using it in a sentence) to reach out to him.

    I am using the word as a "thing" that the person owns. Is this the correct way to use it, if you were reading it would it make sense or is there a better way to use this word? Rather than it being a "thing" that is owned, should it be something more broad and vague?

    eg. Using the andenå to reach out to him.
    eg. Using andenå to reach out to him.

    Any advice would be much appreciated :)
     
  2. Cave Troll
    Online

    Cave Troll Bite the bullet, do your own thing. Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2015
    Messages:
    3,776
    Likes Received:
    2,401
    Location:
    Where cushions are comfy, and straps hold firm.
    So it is telepathy. The Italics is fine, unless the word pops up in dialogue. Then it would look a little funny.
    When you are 'speaking' in telepathy, it is also a good idea to use different symbols for the speech so
    that it is clear that it is not normal dialogue in the traditional sense. (Voices in a singular head seem to
    be the exception as no one else can hear them.)

    I think you should briefly let the reader know what it is and does, as well as what types of individuals
    can use it. Unless it is something that is quite common of course. I am not really sure if you can own
    a mutation. Kinda like unless they created the conditions that gave them the mutation, it is more or
    less a natural and odd evolution.

    IDK, I tried to reason this one, and it is difficult without knowing the reasons why one would have such
    a power essentially. Basically to own something in this context is only if they themselves created it.
     
    Nicolle Evans likes this.
  3. Wreybies
    Offline

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    18,859
    Likes Received:
    10,032
    Location:
    Puerto Rico
    Either is fine, in my opinion, and from a linguistic frame, whether a thing is referred to as just thing or the thing is a matter of convention. I have found that using the thing in these types of fantasy/sci-fi settings can lend a tone of being mildly overworked since it's the less common of the two ways in which to refer to anything that is intangible or abstracted.
     
  4. Wreybies
    Offline

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    18,859
    Likes Received:
    10,032
    Location:
    Puerto Rico
    I would also add (though it was not solicited) that the å will have little meaning to readers of English who are not also familiar with Swedish or Danish. Since English is not a language that naturally has diacritics (only in borrowed words, and usually only kept in French borrows for whatever reason) these kinds of orthographic oddities will end up being given whatever value the individual reader decides to ascribe, usually none, being read as a simple "a".

    Not saying not to use, but don't be too upset if people pronounce in ways other than you intended. ;)
     
    Nicolle Evans likes this.
  5. big soft moose
    Offline

    big soft moose Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,380
    Likes Received:
    972
    John Scalzi does this with brainpal (a computer his soldiers have in their heads that can talk to each other wirelessly) , he put his brainpal dialogue in ::double colons::

    In terms of talking about it once he's established that 'brain pal' is a thing , he just uses it as she would any other word


    ' "theres fucking thousands of them" Bender exclaimed

    ::Brainpal , you arsehole :: I sent
    '
     

Share This Page