1. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    Inventing new words/ Your Expressions Thread

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Cacian, Nov 21, 2011.

    I enjoy writing and therefore whenever I write poetry or stories I find myself inventing new words and expressions.
    this one of the words I have invented which some members in another site really liked and might even adopt:
    writing should be able to not only improve yourm ind your self anb make you feel good but it should also allow to progress in terms of inventing new words and expressions.

    RAPTION which means when things and movements are forever caught up in time.

    my own expression:

    if youcan flick a card I can reader faster then you can say pie'

    what new words and expressions have you come up with?
     
  2. lostinwebspace
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    lostinwebspace Active Member

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    I don't create new words when I write.
     
  3. shadowwalker
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    shadowwalker Contributing Member Contributor

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    Ditto. I write intending to communicate, not confuse.
     
  4. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    ditto the ditto in re prose for adults...

    however, if writing poetry, or rhymed text for p/bs, i've been known to coin a word or two...
     
  5. cruciFICTION
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    cruciFICTION Contributing Member Contributor

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    I've only really "created" one new word, and that was unfocus because it made more sense than any of the alternatives.
     
  6. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    I very occasionally put unusual words together, like 'dream-swollen brain', but it can get very purple-prosy if it's done too often. I often want to make up a word when there's a term in my other language that doesn't exist in English, e.g. a word to describe going about with friends when you're having fun dropping in on people and visiting places--'promende' is wrong, 'hang out' is too near slang for me--nope, can't find a word for 'gezmek'.
     
  7. Protar
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    Protar Active Member

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    Oh I thought this thread would be more about fantasy terms and idioms rather than brand new words. I did however think up the word tapestrious to describe something really fancifully and beautifully decorated. As in like a tapestry. I have yet to use it though.
     
  8. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    I like the expression to coin. It has a strong visual feel to it , the act of flicking a coin ,which is perfectly round, is eternally turning in a circular exact movement.
    do you keep track of your invented words?
     
  9. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    I
    gezmek? is that a new word?
    there is a new word I came up with like half robot half zebra which could be used in a SF book and this
    ''zebrot'':p

    what are fantasy terms and idioms? I am not aware of them?
    I like tapestrious it has that feel of tapestry coming through, nothing to do with tapas of course:p
     
  10. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    ^^ sorry, 'gezmek' is the word in Turkish that I can't find an English substitute for. There's another word, 'yakamoz', which I love, meaning 'the image of the moon reflected in the water' but there's no (one) word for that in English, either! But there are so many more different adjectives and words with multiple meanings in English that I shouldn't complain.
     
  11. Tesoro
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    Tesoro Contributing Member Contributor

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    I've been doing it occasionally in italian when I couldn't find a word for what I was trying to say (even though there was a word in my language), so I made it up and people usually understood them, they just smiled at my creativity, lol. Italian is in fact the most creative language I know. Love it!!
     
  12. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    Oh I get it.
    Gezmek sounds like 'marcha' in Spanish to me, which is exactly what you trying to describe, or even in Irish when they say the 'crack' .
    Yakamoz sounds Japanese to me because Japenese language have lots of Y an K and Z in their words like Yoko or Kawazaki.
    my idead in this thread is that if you cannot find the word then invent a new word or just describe it.
    I am thinking that if you use one word then you would lose out on a whole description of
    ''the image of the moon reflected in the water.''
    I personally prefer this sentence to just the one word.
     
  13. leafmould
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    leafmould Senior Member

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    Word invention can be a part of writing because anything at all can go into dialogue. Perhaps a character has a fancy for coming up with new words.

    Note that all new verbs - to email, for example - are regular. The list of irregular verbs is fixed and cannot be added to, officially.

    A new one of mine is:

    To whimble (regular verb): to ramble through a piece of music on a whim, instead of sticking to the discipline depicted by the musical notation; to write in a disconnected, meandering manner.

    As an irregular verb used by a zany character:

    whimble, whamble, whumble.

    I don't think this works:

    He whamble through the concert.

    This version sounds better to my reading ears:

    He whimbled through the concert.


    We get nouns, whimbler and whimbling, and an adjective, whimbly.

    Like with "friendly", no adverb. Something like "in a whimbly manner" would have to be used.


    Word invention - good fun!
     
  14. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    no, i don't...
     
  15. architectus
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    architectus Banned

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    I invent words in sci-fi. It seems to come naturally from the context of the story and universe I built.

    An example is namverse: the world where physical souls exist, made of the particles in dark energy, of which modern scientists haven't yet found.

    Brainlink: a wireless network that interfaces with brain chips, allowing usering to access the net via thoughts. It allows for a type of telepathic communication.

    Nanites: not my invention. Nano-bots.

    Namites: Similar to nanites but only exist in Namverse.
     
  16. Patrick94
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    Patrick94 Active Member

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    On my ideas sheets, I've written elegate - to rip someone limb from limb - I don't know how I thought of it. Just now I Googled it and the only word explanation I found was in the urban dictionary elegate Verb To pass a task or responsibility to another, usually more senior, person. The opposite of the verb to delegate.
    The staff would elegate anything but the simplest of tasks to their manager.
     
  17. FoxPaw
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    FoxPaw Senior Member

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    If it's a fantasy or sci-fi setting then yes, I might invent words and/or languages. Other than that, I try not to.
     

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