1. Domino355
    Offline

    Domino355 Contributing Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2014
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    116

    Adventure Is Adventure a Dying Genre

    Discussion in 'By the Genre' started by Domino355, Aug 11, 2016.

    Basically, my question. I mean, the grand travel stories, series of quests. I just can't find many new adcenture stories being published.
    What do you think? Is it that people just aren't interested in these kinds of stories anymore (well it is one of the oldest genres in the book)? That it is just too tropy and writers can't get anything new from it, or maybe that these stories are too linear?
     
  2. Keystroke
    Offline

    Keystroke New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    5
    I personally think that all of the great adventures on Earth have been explored, and people have realized that. So, they filled the void with science fiction adventures, but the space craze wore out and is pretty much over. We'll probably see some revival within the next 20 years or so, though, based on the survival stories becoming popular.

    Just my two cents, take with a grain of salt.
     
  3. Aeriion
    Offline

    Aeriion Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2016
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Florida
    I would say Adventure is becoming more of a subgenre more than anything. Much like Keystroke stated, much of the world has already been discovered and this leaves little in the ways of Adventure. So most adventures will take place in a selective few manners. 1. Young Kids discovering the world themselves. 2. Fictionary worlds developed in order to create the ability for an Adventure timeline. 3. TombRaider - In reflection, I would not say Adventure is a "dying" genre, but more a stagnating one. Nothing new in terms of idea sparking material has been introduced in human society so thus, not many books being PRIMARILY adventure based. Though I guess debatably, many fictions could be classified adventure as characters are going place to place. So a question, what does Adventure mean to you?
     
  4. ChickenFreak
    Offline

    ChickenFreak Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    Messages:
    8,967
    Likes Received:
    5,491
    Random theory: Maybe the fact that most of the planet is explored and known discourages stories that are about travel discovery, so that that impulse is redirected to worlds that are purely fictional--fantasy and science fiction.
     
    Malisky likes this.
  5. Lea`Brooks
    Offline

    Lea`Brooks Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 11, 2013
    Messages:
    2,625
    Likes Received:
    1,720
    Location:
    Virginia, United States
    Are the Percy Jackson books not considered adventure stories? Because they go all over the country, and the world in the second series. Percy Jackson and the Olympians, Heroes of Olympus, Kane Chronicles, and Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard all follow the same kind of format.
     
    Seraph751 likes this.
  6. Lew
    Online

    Lew Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2015
    Messages:
    589
    Likes Received:
    404
    I did one that fits your definition to a tee. A Roman diplomatic mission to China in 100AD, a helluva 17,000 mile quest with lots of adventure in what is for most readers a whole new undiscovered world: Storms, pirates, firefights, skullduggery, unlikely alliances, a disaster in the court, a dramatic rescue, return overland with the nomadic Xiongnu, silk road caravans, the Bactrian empire (modern Afghanistan)... something unexpected happens every chapter. Be sure to buy a copy of "The Eagle and the Dragon, a Novel of Rome and China" as soon as I can get an agent and a publisher. (Shameless plug!)
     
    tonguetied likes this.
  7. Commandante Lemming
    Offline

    Commandante Lemming Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2014
    Messages:
    1,241
    Likes Received:
    1,000
    You may not be looking in the right genre labels - a lot of SciFi and Fantasy can follow a very traditional adventure story format.

    One of the hotter titles this year is David Levine's "Arabella of Mars" - which despite the title is actually in the Fantasy realm - and from what I hear that one is straight-up high-seas adventure-questing.

    I also just read the first book of Karl Schroeder's Virga series - "Sun of Suns" - which in fairness is ten years old, but that's a fairly well respected SciFi series and the first book was, again, straight up high-seas adventure (including pirates) just without the water.
     
    tonguetied likes this.
  8. Midnight_Adventurer
    Offline

    Midnight_Adventurer Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    If you're talking about globe trotting adventures that involve heroes and villains, ancient artifacts or lost cities and the world is at stake then there are still authors out there writing these styles of books. Matthew Reilly is known for his action thrillers with his new book, The Four Legendary Kingdoms, eagerly anticipated. Andy McDermott and Clive Cussler are two more active authors in the genre. I'm currently writing my own globe trotting adventure and still believe it's a genre that holds great wonder and possibility. Just saying.
     
    tropicanahana likes this.
  9. FireWater
    Offline

    FireWater Active Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2016
    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    139
    Yeah, there's tons of stories that are like that. They just go by different labels. At the bookstore I hang around in, the "Fantasy" section has loads of books involving the tropey things like warriors and quests et al (of course, there's also much more diversity beyond solely those things). Also, other related genres, like sci-fi and dystopia, have similar elements as well. Books in the YA section also include some of those categories.

    So yeah, adventure stories exist, in the sense that probably the vast majority of genre fiction involves an adventure of some kind. ;) It's not just labeled "Adventure" on the cover sticker.
     
  10. jannert
    Offline

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,788
    Likes Received:
    7,302
    Location:
    Scotland
    Wikepedia defines the Adventure story as: An adventure is an event or series of events that happens outside the course of the protagonist's ordinary life, usually accompanied by danger, often by physical action. Adventure stories almost always move quickly, and the pace of the plot is at least as important as characterization, setting and other elements of a creative work.[1]

    The notion of exploration (as in going someplace where NOBODY has been before) isn't really part of the genre. Adventure stories take the protagonist somewhere THEY have never been before, that will involve danger and physical action. I'd say Romancing the Stone and the other movies like that are Adventure stories (made into movies), even though where the protagonist goes is not an unknown part of the world.

    I would expect that it's the 'adventure' part of the story that is important in this genre, more so than defeating bad guys or solving mysteries, or whatever else the plot includes. It's the tackling of something new and dangerous that seems to drive the genre.
     
    tonguetied likes this.
  11. Mumble Bee
    Offline

    Mumble Bee The writer formerly known as Chained. Contributor

    Joined:
    May 18, 2015
    Messages:
    791
    Likes Received:
    1,305
    If you're wondering what happened to adventure shows like Johnny Quest, they got killed off by parodies, namely Venture Bros.

    Its like how it took James Bond and Mission Impossible a few years to get back into the game after Austin Powers. When your genre turns into a joke, it either has to be reinvented or dropped.
     
    tonguetied likes this.
  12. theamorset
    Offline

    theamorset Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2016
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    68
    Location:
    midwest
    I don't think the genre is dying, I just think people expect more than just a quest. There needs to be well structured characters, deeper meaning, etc.

    I'm not sure authors have to come up with something so horribly 'unique' or 'different', but there has got to be some sort of feeling, some sort of emotion, to the work.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2016

Share This Page