1. Fife
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    Fife Senior Member

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    I've Never Written a Script Before...

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Fife, Nov 12, 2012.

    It seems, intuitively, they are meant to be performed (e.g. play, movie, etc.). Are there people who prefer reading a script to reading a novel or traditionally written story? Are there people who write scripts without intentions of seeing them perform based on the fact that it is more effective to be read in script-form given certain circumstances? I've never really known much about scripts. Most people I've met that have ever mentioned about scripts were hoping to have them put in a movie--which I guess, would be the equivalent to having it published, I presume. Any thoughts?
     
  2. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i mentor and provide writing services for aspiring screenwriters, so can tell you from many years' experience, that some people do write scripts 'just for fun'... they may harbor hidden thoughts of having something produced some day, but they don't actively pursue such a dream...

    in the many decades i've been helping writers, i can recall only one person who said they read scripts for entertainment, as they do prose...
     
  3. robertpri007
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    robertpri007 Member

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    If you think the competition to get published is rough, I suspect getting a SP to film is a quantum leap. I took two screen writing courses, and attended several SP seminars, and I can say for certain that the new knowledge has helped my fiction manuscripts enormously. You have about 105-115 pages to create worthy characters and intriguing plot and cannot waste a word.

    Writing screenplays may never pay off, but it's a wonderful learning experience.
     
  4. Fullmetal Xeno
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    Fullmetal Xeno Protector of Literature Contributor

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    Yeah i attempted to write a script before, let's say it's not so easy.. so for now i'm just sticking with novels...
     
  5. Selbbin
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    Selbbin I hate you Contributor

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    I've been involved in scripts for a long time now and there is a huge range of quality in terms of the prose. Some scripts get straight to the point while others are more interesting to read; and then you have the shooting scripts after the spec scripts have been taken away. The quality of the script comes down to the story itself and how that can be related to the screen. Novel writing and script writing are very different creatures. A novel is self contained, while a script is a plan. A screenwriter needs to be very aware of how the film may be produced, and must allow the director and actors to flesh it out. A script is the bases for sound and light, so if it isn't seen or heard in some way then it shouldn't be written; this includes emotion. Often the Director will take a script and either work on it him/herself or hire another writer before allowing actors their input (if they, or producers, allow it). A script is never finished until he final cut of the film. I'm not aware of anyone who reads scripts for fun, as it's own medium, as there are many elements that are often missing; gaps for the film-makers to fill with visuals and audio. I do know of people who read scripts after they have seen the film. But I did have a producer once tell me that he read my script out loud to his wife, in one go, while on holidays and they both had a great time. So it can work.
     
  6. Edward M. Grant
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    Edward M. Grant Contributing Member

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    As mentioned, not many people read scripts for fun. However, with the low cost of cameras and editing equipment these days, writing a script and making the movie to a competent standard is quite possible for a relatively low price, particularly if you base it around the things you have available (e.g. if you live in a wood, don't set the movie at the Great Wall of China). CGI also allows a lot of opportunities for lowering costs if you can do it yourself.
     
  7. EyezForYou
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    EyezForYou Active Member

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    Scripts are a whole different beast. You can't write any monologues or have any interior dialogues. One must show the reader everything as if relaying them on screen. Everything must be action and in active verbs. You can do well if you read many scripts that's already written and learn from there.
     
  8. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    of course you can have monologues and inner dialogues in a script... they're found in many screenplays, as you can see from movies containing same... such as the delightful 'ferris bueller's day off' for just one prime example...

    as for verbs, the description/action element must be written in simple declarative present tense... no 'ing' verbs...

    in re studying scripts to learn how, the ones you'll find will not be spec scripts, so when you've got a good track record of produced films under your belt, you can indulge in the exceptions you'll find there, but for a new and unknown writer writing specs, 'lean and clean' is a must...
     

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