1. ricardo_85
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    ricardo_85 New Member

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    Just a quick question on homophones.

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by ricardo_85, Apr 28, 2009.

    When do you use too and to, where and were, there and their

    (as I looked to the sky. Is that correct?)

    or does anyone know of a thread with these already explain?

    Cheers all
     
  2. chandler245
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    chandler245 Banned

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    Where would be (Where did you come from?)
    Were is (Were you helping him?)
    There would be (Over there, you will find everything you are looking for)
    Their is (The children need their parents permission to go.)

    Where is a place
    were can be used as were and we're as in we are
    There is a place
    Their is meaning more than two people
    I hope this will help a little. Not sure if there is a sight on here about that but I am sure there is somewhere.
     
  3. ricardo_85
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    ricardo_85 New Member

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    Yes that helps thanks alot
     
  4. chandler245
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    chandler245 Banned

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    My bad sorry about the confusion
     
  5. Mystery Meat
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    The easiest way that I remember them is to use Too as an adverb. As in "I want to eat too." It is also used when referring to a relative measure, as in "too many" or "too hot".

    For all other uses use "To".
     
  6. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    or does anyone know of a thread with these already explain?

    yes... it's called a 'dictionary'... ;-)

    seriously, if you'd looked up each of those words, you wouldn't have had to ask...
     
  7. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Where and were are not homphones because they're pronounced differently.
    However, where has at least two homophones, wear and ware:
    Where is the bathroom?
    Wear that delicious blue dress tonight.
    But ware the wolf that prowls that dark forest!

    The other two are actually triple homophones as given:
    To, too, and two
    There, their, and they're
     
  8. Sphi
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    Sphi Member

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    If you have trouble with "where" than keep in mind:
    warily - worriedly, uneasily
    wearily - tiredly
     
  9. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    Dictionary definitions are useless for explaining simple words because they tend to define them with more complex, and provide no examples of how to use them. Perfect example "They is a third-person, personal pronoun." Some dictionaries would define "their" as the posessive form of "they". If you don't understand how to use "they," terms like "third person" and "personal pronoun" are not going to help. It really only helps in a case like this if you know how to use the words but forget which spelling is for which use.

    It refers to more than ONE person. It's the posessive form of they, so "This that family's house" can be written as "This is their house," if you know who "their" refers to.
     
  10. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    it's incumbent upon anyone who wants to be a 'writer' to have a good, example-providing dictionary close at hand... these days, that can even be accessed with the click of a mouse... the one i use myself is a good example of only one of many helpful dictionaries:

     

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