1. dillseed
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    dillseed Active Member

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    Punctuation Last one on hyphens

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by dillseed, May 21, 2014.

    Are these punctuated correctly (after the verbs, i.e., no hyphens)? The words are in boldface font.

    He is old fashioned.
    But: old-fashioned ideas


    She is well known, well educated, and well thought of.
    But: a well-known, well-educated, well-thought-of person

    Her explanation was dead on.
    But: a dead-on explanation

    He was ill equipped for the job.
    But: an ill-equipped mechanic

    Her face was beet red.
    But: a beet-red face

    The test was fill in the blank.
    But: a fill-in-the-blank test

    The test was multiple choice.
    But: a multiple-choice question

    ****General Rule: And if a dictionary lists a word as a hyphenated adjective, we do NOT hyphenate it after a to-be verb or other verb, correct?

    Example:
    old-fashioned (adj.)
    He had old-fashioned ways. (Hyphens.)
    But: He was old fashioned. (No hyphens.)

    Correct to everything above?

    Thank you.



     
    Last edited: May 21, 2014
  2. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    The "fill-in-the-blank" case is an exception because of the word "fill," which can be mistaken as functioning as a verb. The hyphens are included there for clarity.

    In the first example, "old-fashioned" is actually a compound word, and I would leave the hyphen. But it looks like modern English is moving away from this practice, so I suppose it could go either way.

    Everything else I agree with.
     
  3. dillseed
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    dillseed Active Member

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    Thank you.
     
  4. dillseed
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    dillseed Active Member

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    Would you personally favor:

    She is good looking.
    -or-
    She is good-looking.
     
  5. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    The second one (with the hyphen).

    For a more detailed explanation of when to use hyphens and when not to, check out this page from Oxford Dictionaries.
     
  6. dillseed
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    dillseed Active Member

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    Thank you. :)
     

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