1. Leena
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    Leena New Member

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    Most successful/popular writing style for paranormal fiction...

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Leena, Nov 8, 2010.

    Hello everyone!

    So, those who have already bumped into me should know that I've been working on something for about a year now... So far, it's been ssslooow going people. With NO real education in novel writing -- aside from some research on the world wide web -- I'm flip flopping over the perfect style of writing for my story.

    In your opinion, what on earth do the majority of paranormal fiction loving readers prefer that would possibly make the story more captivating and successful? OR, what usually works best to keep things flowing smoothly for the writer in this particular genre?? Believe it or not it's really too soon for me to tell... I'm torn... like the pages in my story will be if I don't figure this out!! I really don't wanna get to the middle regretting the style I chose to go with... hmmm, what to do what to do...

    So far it's been third person for me... a whole lot of "so and so said, he/she replied, Frank took a deep breath and continued," etc... after almost every statement! I'm trying to seperate each character and keep the reader up to date on who said what... know what I mean? I'm having issues with the fact that when I review a chapter, there seems to be a lot of repetition concerning that type of stuff. I really don't know how else to keep all of my characters in line with this style! Is first person a better read? I'd love some advice so that I can finally move this thing along!!

    Thanks everyone!!!
     
  2. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    It's hard to find something that all paranormal fiction novels have in common. You should go back and reread the writers you liked/admired most and ask yourself what he/she did that you felt was particularly successful. Then try to incorporate those things in your own writing. Don't worry if you feel that you're copying another writer's style. After enough time and practice, you'll learn to develop your own style of writing.

    As for your other question, stick to third person since it's easier to write well in that POV, especially for newer writers.
     
  3. Islander
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    Islander Contributing Member Contributor

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    Usually, the reader doesn't notice the "he said/she said"s. But it's hard to tell if you're overusing it without seeing the actual writing. It's very useful to participate in a workshop, like the Review Room on this site.

    I think these little interjections with body language makes the writing better, at least if they're well used.
     
  4. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    When it comes to writing what the top selling books got in common is that they are easy to read and with clear conflicts and with intense emotional relationships between the characters. But there are both examples of very successful third and first person writers.

    One other point that to create successful speculative fiction you need to create a strong consitency and framework for the way the world works. This is not to say that you need strong and extremely defined laws of how things works dowb until the magic feels like spelbook D&D style. But that if you capture a sense of how the story is told and stick to it. For example the movie "Stardust" do not explain how things work but every time you encounter some new magic or aspect of the story it feel like it fits right in to the theme and mode of what you been shown before. The same thing with Harry Potter, or the Dresden files.

    The feeling of repetition and how description falls flat comes from that you is a beginner. You got to write about a million practice words before you start to get good at writing.
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    you don't have to ask us... all you have to do is go to a book store and take a look at what's on the bestseller rack and on the shelves for that genre!

    if you don't want to go to that much trouble, you can use the 'look inside' feature at amazon after selecting that genre in the search menu...
     
  6. Naiyn
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    Naiyn Contributing Member

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    As far as the "he said/she saids" go, try making it clear through the dialogue itself which character is talking. You'll still need a few tags for clarity here and there, but it can help get rid of some clutter.

    Another way is as Islander suggested. An interjection of some kind not only breaks up the monotony of he/she said, but can help bring the scene to life.
     
  7. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    Wrong question. What you need to ask is what style suits this particular story and your writing style best. Try writing a key section in different styles, and see which you think works.
     
  8. starseed
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    starseed Contributing Member

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    I never use any "said" tags in any of my writing. Ever. I did at the beginning and learned a better writing style for me which clearly demonstrates who is talking. I find it much nicer to read as I've always been annoyed with the repeating, "he said/she said" stuff. It's just unnecessary. I write like this:

    "It feels cold in here." Emily clutched her sweater around her chest. "Weirdly cold."

    Jim held out his jacket. "Take this."

    "Thanks."

    ^In this little exchange it should be obvious when Emily is talking and when Jim is talking. If their conversation was to continue, it would continue to be obvious, if written right, just based on the dialogue and their actions.
     
  9. Mallory
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    Mallory Mallegory. Contributor

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    As far as what makes it more captivating for me --

    In paranormal stories, I prefer it when there's ambiguity as to what "it" is: it's clear by now that it's no human or animal, but what could it be...a monster, an evil spirit, a demon, etc?

    Don't go for anything overused. Personally, I don't find ghosts, vampires or "evil spirits" very scary to read about, unless there's a huge twist to make them different from what 100000s of people do. Do something UNIQUE, leave just enough to the imagination -- although you will want some amped-up descriptions later, build up to it and create lots of suspense.
     
  10. Leena
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    Leena New Member

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    Uuuh... duh? Haha, it really is a no brainer isn't it!!! Thanks for letting me know about amazon mammamaia... will check it out.
     

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