1. 123456789
    Offline

    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,338
    Likes Received:
    3,085

    Nabokov explained

    Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by 123456789, Feb 27, 2015.

    Everything I knew in my heart about Nabokov's literature is perfectly (and coherently) explained here in words. This is what literary experts are for. I'm still trying to digest all of it.

    http://www.newrepublic.com/article/books-and-arts/nabokovs-puppet-show-part-ii


    (I did not include part I as it more introductory, but it's easy to find just google part I)
     
    Lemex and peachalulu like this.
  2. Lemex
    Offline

    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    Messages:
    10,507
    Likes Received:
    3,151
    Location:
    Northeast England
    Thank you very much for posting this. I've been meaning to get into Nabokov, I've not read anything by him beside a lecture on Kafka, and this should serve me well when I eventually get around to him. I've favourited it. :)
     
  3. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,891
    Location:
    Boston
    I've read parts of Speak, Memory, and it's amazing how an autobiography can be written so beautifully (just like his fiction). He really was a very talented writer.
     
  4. Lemex
    Offline

    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    Messages:
    10,507
    Likes Received:
    3,151
    Location:
    Northeast England
    He was an excellent critic too, with a fantastic taste in literature. It's hard to believe he was Russian. I know he was an aristocrat, but back in his day the Russian nobility looked to France and the French more than English. For him to become so adept at not only French, but also English, and (obviously) German ... that's one hell of a mind for learning languages!
     
  5. peachalulu
    Offline

    peachalulu Contributing Member Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    May 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,828
    Likes Received:
    2,382
    Location:
    occasionally Oz , mainly Canada
    I haven't read the two posts yet but I've saved them. I like reading stuff about Nabokov - he's one of my favorites. Recently, I've been reading a book called Freud and Nabokov which is quite fascinating. I had to re take it out because I hadn't finished it. Nabokov was not a fan of Freud - lol. So it makes for an interesting clash of ideas.
     
  6. Frazen
    Offline

    Frazen Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Australia
    I have not read his works but I don't feel good about him, for what he said about Dostoyevsky(my favorite and most loved author).
     
  7. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,891
    Location:
    Boston
    His opinion about Dostoevsky shouldn't influence you one way or the other. We all like certain writers and hate others. All I know is that Nabokov is one of the best writers ever. Few writers can match his use of language. He's definitely worth reading.
     
    Lemex likes this.
  8. Steerpike
    Online

    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    11,074
    Likes Received:
    5,271
    Location:
    California, US
    I like Dostoevsky and Nabokov both. Totally different types of writers, of course. Not many people are in Nabokov's league when it comes to use of the language.
     
  9. Steerpike
    Online

    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    11,074
    Likes Received:
    5,271
    Location:
    California, US
    Reminds me of Conrad. I think English was his third language.
     
    Lemex likes this.

Share This Page