1. John Carlo
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    John Carlo Active Member

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    Plot problem - ideas welcome

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by John Carlo, Oct 18, 2009.

    Okay, here is the basic thing I want in my novel: I'm trying to put forth a prophecy in the beginning that to me will mean being able to easily guess the ending of the novel half-way through the book. I'm trying to make the prophecy vague, but then it just borders stupidity. Any general help on how to figure out how to say something direct without giving too much info (especially for the ending), I would greatly appreciate.
     
  2. von Pook
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    von Pook Contributing Member

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    Do you mean a prophecy that seems very clear and obvious but then changes its meaning as events change. Like the Anakin Skywalker prophecy in Star Wars? "A prophesy, misread, may have been." Yoda.
     
  3. sirhoot
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    sirhoot Member

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    To say something direct without giving too much info? If the correct answer is one of a multitude of answers or something unknown unless more information is gathered.

    I do have a suggestion...

    Write the novel then write the prophecy. That way it will be easier to reference specific parts of the novel as the reader would become aware of them.

    Another option would be to write out the prophecy with no regard for its ambiguity, making sure all the relevant points were included. The prophecy can then be re-written as the novel develops, to obfuscate it's real meaning.
     
  4. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    The best prophecies are phrased in such a way they can easily be misinterpreted, or so that opposing sides can each believe it predicts their victory.

    So write it initially so that it appears to favor the incorrect interpretation, but with every specific actually pointing to the truth.

    Certain words are very prone to misinterpretation. For example, a doom is not necessarily a disaster. It can simply indicate a fate that is predicted with a high degree of certainty.
     
  5. John Carlo
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    John Carlo Active Member

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    I like this approach. Thank you. I also like Cogito's as well,

    "The best prophecies are phrased in such a way they can easily be misinterpreted, or so that opposing sides can each believe it predicts their victory.

    So write it initially so that it appears to favor the incorrect interpretation, but with every specific actually pointing to the truth."

    Good stuff guys, it gives me some stuff to think about.
     
  6. Mark R
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    Mark R Member

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    i prefer the sort of prophecy that doesnt tell you who wins.

    maybe it says that there'll be a big battle, or a showdown between good and evil, and then...

    the next page got lost. :)
     

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