1. Leonardo Pisano
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    Leonardo Pisano Active Member

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    Question regarding the POV

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by Leonardo Pisano, Feb 22, 2011.

    I have a scene where two persons (John and Mary) are talking. The POV is a third person narrator, but thoughts of Mary are shown.

    The problem is: Mary leaves the room and John starts making a telephone call. Can you now show some reflective thinking of John now? Intuitively I say that's ok, because there cannot be confusion. In fact, a new scene emerges - right?

    I hope the question makes sense.
     
  2. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    As long as it works and is not confusing to the reader or plot you can try anything with the POV.
     
  3. zilly
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    zilly Senior Member

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    It doesn't seem like it would be confusing. I don't see anything wrong with that.
     
  4. Porcupine
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    Porcupine Contributing Member

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    It also doesn't seem to be a very long story. Why don't you just write it, then read it, and see what it does? My guess is it will be ok.
     
  5. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    What you're discussing, Leonardo Pisano, is a form of Omniscient POV.

    You can find a lot of information online about it, and also try reading (or rereading) a few novels that use Omniscient POV, and it will become apparent how to employ the technique you're discussing.

    Romance Novels often use Omniscient POV, but the most common these days seems to be Third Person Limited POV.
     
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  6. Leonardo Pisano
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    Leonardo Pisano Active Member

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    It's a scene, Porcupine, just 1/40 of the book.

    TWErvin2: thanks for the term. I try to be consistent w/ my POV. I have two story lines, and the POV obviously need to change. But within a scene I think I need to stick with one - although I think my question is now answered and as long there isn't any confusion it's allowed.

    Thanks all.
     

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