1. robertpri007
    Offline

    robertpri007 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2012
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    3

    Regardless of poli-party, has a debate ever made you change your vote?

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by robertpri007, Oct 20, 2012.

    I am surprised when the polls change after a debate. I can see the 'non-committed' being swayed in a debate, but if you have a favorite, I can't imagine a debate changing one's mind. Or am I completely wrong? [heh, not the first time]

    added: Agreen made a good point about local vs national politics. Because of the recent debates, I was just considering presidential debates, but failed to make that clear until seeing Agreen's post. He is right. Local debates have swayed me but not presidential.
     
  2. Agreen
    Offline

    Agreen Faceless Man Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,143
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    Canada
    Certainly for local politics. For federal and provincial elections, no, my votes are based on platform, especially because in Canada we vote for local representatives and not directly for the Prime Minister/Premier. Had I vote in the US election, neither debate would have changed the way I'd vote. That being said, I could see the debates influencing someone who hasn't researched the candidates thoroughly enough to have an opinion. If they hadn't made a decision on ideological grounds, and don't care about policy, I guess I could see someone who only watched the first debate voting Romney, or someone who only watched the second voting Obama, just based on the assertiveness and confidence (or lack thereof) they showed in those debates.
     
  3. SJ Wonder
    Offline

    SJ Wonder New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Somewhere in the middle of nowhere Nebraska
    Canada's got it made--no perpetual election cycle. Lucky dogs. But to answer the question of whether a debate changed my vote--nope. But then again, I'm a poli-wonk so I'm never undecided for very long.
     
  4. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Fair warning

    As with every thread dealing with controversial subjects, this one will be closely watched. As long as everyone remains respectful toward everyone else's beliefs, the thread may continue.

    FAIR WARNING! In the past, we have simply closed the thread when it gets too heated. This time, whoever takes it to the point that requires it to be closed will also be subject to an infraction.

    We have had a very poor track record with contraversial threads in the past, and this is why we will follow a zero-tolerance policy on this one.

    So please keep the tone respectful at all times. And remember, nation-bashing is ALSO considered insulting other members, so no derogatory marks about how one country does things better or worse either.
     
  5. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    in a word, 'no'...
     
  6. chicagoliz
    Offline

    chicagoliz Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    Messages:
    3,295
    Likes Received:
    815
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    The debates, like all things at this point in the election are for the low-information voters who haven't made up their minds. They're pure theater. I've always been amazed that there are any undecideds at this point, because there are major differences between the candidates on so many issues, and one must know how one feels about most of them.

    So, I've never changed my mind at this point. Debates that are either early in the primary season, where there are many candidates with similar viewpoints on many issues, can be helpful. Also, as was pointed out, debates for local offices, where there has not been as much attention focused on the candidate's differences, and where there are specific issues with positions that haven't already been well-established, are much more helpful.
     
  7. Lemex
    Offline

    Lemex That's Lord Lemex to you. Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    Messages:
    10,507
    Likes Received:
    3,151
    Location:
    Northeast England
    No. My opinion of someone has changed while watching a political debate, but not my politics.

    Over the years I've changed my political allegiance, quite dramatically. But that is for another reason entirely.
     
  8. James Berkley
    Offline

    James Berkley Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2011
    Messages:
    448
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    NYC
    short answer no for national level.

    though i will say after the first debate i liked Romney more. granted i just disliked both of them more after the second.

    i had decide to vote for a third party candidate months ago, and i really cant see anything the two main party candidates can do to change that.
     
  9. Banzai
    Offline

    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2007
    Messages:
    12,871
    Likes Received:
    150
    Location:
    Reading, UK
    Well, the leader debates at the last UK general election convinced me that David Cameron's reputation as a smooth and charismatic character were nonsense, and simply borne out of comparison to his predecessors (a vampire, a charisma vacuum, an ideologue, a grey suit and Thatcher).

    But no, I'm pretty secure in my general political philosophy, and I make my mind up on individual issues fairly quickly. Debates usually only affect my views on individual politicians.
     
  10. Thumpalumpacus
    Offline

    Thumpalumpacus Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2012
    Messages:
    566
    Likes Received:
    106
    Location:
    Texas
    No. As we televise them here (America), the debates aren't an exposition or exchange of ideas. They're political theater, and not worth watching. I do my homework and usually have my mind made up before the conventions.
     
  11. Agreen
    Offline

    Agreen Faceless Man Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,143
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    Canada
    Haha that's how it's supposed to work but the last few years have been a mess- three federal elections, and now one year after winning a minority term the premier of Ontario is stepping down, so there's going to be another election in the next 6-10 months. Of course even with the federal government shored up another 3 years, things like question period are still just political theatre meant to produce sound bites rather than sound policy.
     
  12. Selbbin
    Offline

    Selbbin I hate you Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    Messages:
    3,234
    Likes Received:
    1,804
    Location:
    Australia
    No. I've never been legally allowed to vote. :(
     
  13. Hettyblue
    Offline

    Hettyblue Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Middle England
    Like Canada we (in UK) vote for local representatives and the leader of the winning party becomes Prime Minister - though the presentation of the elections has become increasingly presidential, which is unhealthy as it is misleading. It is a shame that televisation and media led elections result in popularity/ personality competitions instead of policy being the key.

    As far as being swayed by debate - when it comes to my vote I am generally not swayed by one individual in a party as they are only part of a larger group and the key to what the party represents is in the manifesto and the history of that party. I have used tactical voting in constituencies where I knew the party I always favour is not going to have an ice cube's hope in hell of winning, but that is pragmatism rather than being swayed by a superior arguement.

    Actions also speak louder than words and in the UK the once respected (though never expected to win a national majority) Liberal Democrats, have been totally discredited by their association with the ConDem alliance. Discarded manifesto promises, grubby compromises and a leader that is considered little more than Cameron's lap dog - very unfortunate for the LibDem supporters left with a party in tatters, it will take a long time to recover from their taste of coalition governing. It will take more than a convincing speech or two at election time to convince voters I think.
     

Share This Page