1. Patrick94
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    Patrick94 Active Member

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    Science for people with three digit IQs

    Discussion in 'Research' started by Patrick94, Apr 18, 2011.

    Wiki anything to do with science and a whole load of sciency words and formulae. Is there any website(s) that explain time travel, wormholes etc in a 'fun' (ie readable) way?
     
  2. funkybassmannick
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    funkybassmannick Contributing Member

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    There may be some good websites, but if I were you I'd pick up a book or two by Michio Kaku. This guy writes about all that stuff in ways for everyone to understand.

    Two books by him I'd recommend for you are:

    1) Hyperspace
    This book describes everything about wormholes, parallel universes, etc.

    2) Physics of the Impossible
    This book talks about what kind of science-fiction ideas today might actually be possible in the future, and how it can achieved using nascent super technologies of today.

    He's famous for having a super high IQ so that he can understand all this stuff, but explain it in a way us double-digiters can follow. Good luck!
     
  3. KP Williams
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    KP Williams Contributing Member

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    The rules for linking to an external site are hazy, so I won't do it--it's one of the more ridiculous-but-understandable rules here. But I did recently watch a History Channel show called The Universe. There is one episode which is dedicated entirely to time travel. Actually, there are episodes for many such things, including wormholes, alternate realities, etc. Most of them can be found on Youtube.

    These videos also tie into funkybassmannick's suggestions: Michio Kaku is occasionally a guest expert on the show.

    I don't know if that fits your idea of "fun," but I enjoy most things History Channel. And it's at least easier to digest than walls of text sprinkled with indecipherable equations.
     
  4. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    Astronomy and Planetary Science: The Stars and the Interstellar Medium Bk. 1 (Course S281) by Barrie William Jones, etc., et al and Open University Astronomy and Planetary Science

    His website is singlularly uninformative lol

    Maybe try the BBC website its been cutback recently but it usually has a lot of programmes relating to this. Try Brain Cox and Stephen Hawkings Time Travel will give some basics and probably lead to other names.
     
  5. Patrick94
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    Patrick94 Active Member

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    I meant fun as in understandable :p (you know how they all go on 'science id fun!!'?)

    And Youtube is a great idea, didn't think of it :)

    And funkybassmannick, I'll look Michio Kaku up :)

    Thanks guys
     
  6. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    I know lol which is why I gave you Brian Cox his series had a kids version - try Space Hoppers Brain Cox.

    The other books are kind of cool and usually easy to follow. Also try the BBC Education section it used to have a lot of fun games but they may have been cut.
     
  7. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    Kaku is good. Also, Brian Greene. Stephen Hawking may touch on this in A Brief History of Time. It has been a while since I read that, so I can't recall for certain.
     
  8. Patrick94
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    Patrick94 Active Member

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    Where could one acquire those books?
     
  9. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    Online. Barnes & Noble. Probably any book store with a decent-sized science section.
     
  10. funkybassmannick
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    funkybassmannick Contributing Member

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    Right now I think B&N only has his latest book in stock, Phsyics of the Future, but Amazon has them all ready to ship.
     
  11. Porcupine
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    Porcupine Contributing Member

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    You could also ask here. I am a physicist, you know. :p

    There is already a time travel thread in the research section, where a lot of those points have been discussed, any you could just post there and I will be happy to answer. In a fun way, naturally. :cool:

    By the way, if you intend to write science fiction, I don't think you can quite avoid "sciency" words altogether. ;)
     

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