1. manfredjed
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    manfredjed New Member

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    Special quote situations

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by manfredjed, Aug 24, 2011.

    I have come across some abnormal situations with respect to quotes, and I'd like any feedback I can get on correct gramatical structures.

    1. Emphasis of a specially used word. Have is a verb, but when used in the context of a noun, as in describing an object people want, should the word have any special punctuation or highlighting indicating it's not in its normal usage? This question applies in both a quoting application as well as in text.
    "The child reached for the toy. She wanted something to hold onto. It is not a replacement for her mom; it is just a 'have'."

    2. In a quote, there is a special title. How is this punctuated? I want to signify that the title is pronounced with emphasis. Kind of like sarcastically as when people use finger quotes when speaking.
    Bob said, "He is an 'Ambassador of Goodwill.'"

    3. The title of a book in text. Punctuation questions. Do quotes go around the title? Does the period go in the quotes?
    Bob looked at the cover and read the title to himself, "The Westward Adventures of the Survivors".

    4. Listing what a person might say, but not quoting them. How is the punctuation of the sentence handled (period in quotes or out of quotes)? How is the punctuation of doin' handled (where the apostrophe replaces the ending 'g')?
    When greeted in the morning, Bob would offer a "Hi," a "Howdy," or a "How y'all doin'".

    5. In a quote, a special comment is made. Does this comment deserve special recognition? Is punctuation correct? How do you emphasize words in a quote? Use italics? Underline? Capitalize it? Single quote? This mmight be redundant with #2 above.
    "Bob believes this is an example of 'Friendly fire'."

    6. Is it possible to have two people's quotes in the same sentence? Especially when one affects the other?
    Ethyl's cry of "I win" covered up Fred's moaning of "Oh no."

    7. Is there anything wrong with this:
    Moving below her head, he rubbed her shoulders first before drifting to her neck. There he searched for a tendon that always hurt; when she closed her eyes and grimaced, "Boy does that feel good," Jeff knew he found it.

    8. Is it okay to interrupt a quote with action prose?
    "I was watching TV when Bozo here," he used his thumb to point to his son-in-law standing to his right, "asked if he could borrow a ten spot."


    Thanks
     
  2. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    ...that would be ok, but the period must go inside the quotation marks, unless you're writing for the uk market with british usage...

    ...yes, it would go in " "... or, if a quote within a quote, as you have it here, in ' '...

    ...as mentioned above, no, the title would go in italics, not " "... as for periods yes, it does, when " " end a sentence... by us standards, that is... in the uk, while the old rule was for them to go outside, many are now doing it 'our' way...

    ...all ok, except for that outside period... it would go after the elision apostrophe and before the closing quotation mark, just as you've done with the commas...

    ...no capital, since it's not a sentence, nor a proper noun... for once, you've properly placed the period, though...

    ...yes, it's not only possible, but correctly done, except for the missing commas to introduce the quoted words and the fact that one can't 'moan' words...

    ...yes, much!... 1.what is 'moving'?... 2.comma missing after 'first'... 3.improper use of semicolon... 4.one cannot 'grimace' words... 5.'knew' is wrong verb form in that context...

    ...it would be okay, if you included a dialog tag... as is, it isn't...

    hope this helps... i suggest you get yourself a good punctuation guide... it'll save you [and us ;-) ] a lot of time... hugs, m
     
  3. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    He is. That reads perfectly clearly to me.
    Agreed.
    What is improper about it? Joining two closely related sentences is a standard use of a semicolon according to the style guides I have.
    Agreed
    I think that "knew" is the right form, but "found" is the wrong form. "when she closed her eyes and grimaced, [...] Jeff knew he had found it.
     
  4. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    ...not to me, not knowing what came before it... if it was made clear in the previous sentence that he was massaging her with his hands, or whatever, then i agree there would be no confusion... without it, there is, imo...

    doesn't work well there, especially with dialog included in the second half... to my editor's eye, a period would be a much better choice and make better sense...

    right!... i must've not had my morning green tea yet, when i wrote that...
     
  5. manfredjed
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    manfredjed New Member

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    I use a semi colon sometimes to join two closely related sentences. In this case both sentences refer to the same special spot. To me, that relates them.

    Thanks for your help.
     

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