1. Sylvester
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    Sylvester Member

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    Teleport

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Sylvester, Nov 21, 2008.

    In a film script, what is the best way to describe a character teleporting into or out of a scene. Is "teleport" okay or should it be more of an "appear" or "disappear" direction?
     
  2. tehuti88
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    tehuti88 Contributing Member

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    I would go with "teleport" myself, if only because "appear/disappear" can just mean somebody arrived or left. But I wouldn't quote me on it because I don't know scripts. *shrug*
     
  3. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    I would go for teleport, too. The decision of how to accomplish it visually would be up to the director, but teleport makes it clear and unambiguous what action belongs at that point in the scene.

    I too am no expert in scripts - I avoid them, in fact. What I do understand is the need for clarity and simplicity.
     
  4. apathykills
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    apathykills Contributing Member

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    have the character say: "beam me up Scotty" can't get much clearer then that.
    But seriously, I'd just go with: "teleport in" "teleport out"
     
  5. NaCl
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    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

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    I agree with the others about using the term "teleport", although I would offer a short description of how that action should appear. Does the person blink into the scene? Is there some shimmering light that rapidly fuses into the character? Maybe a black spot appears, and grows until it reaches full size, then the person materializes inside this teleportation cocoon before stepping out...the cocoon (black void) than collapses and vanishes with a momentary flash of light as its residual energy releases. Be creative...it's YOUR story!

    This additional description will guide the director in developing special effects that fit with your vision of the event.
     
  6. lipton_lover
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    lipton_lover Contributing Member

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    @NaCI - I have 0% experience with scripts, but it seems to me from what I have seen of good scripts, and just general knowledge, it's up to the directors to make the scene look nice and do the visual creativity. The script writer just gives the bare skeleton. Scripts tell what happens, not how. But, I've never written a script, I've only seen a few. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, please.
     
  7. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i write scripts and mentor screenwriters on a daily basis, have been for many years... and all of you smarties who've recommended restraint and what i call 'sparity and clarity' have nailed it!

    'lean and clean' is what a spec screenwriter has to aim for, so just say they 'teleport' in or out and let the director decide how s/he wants the process to look...

    love and hugs, maia
     
  8. lipton_lover
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    lipton_lover Contributing Member

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    <_< why am I always right about what I don't know about, and wrong about what I *do* know about?
    Either way thought, I'm happy I was right :D
     

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