1. Scarecrow28
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    Scarecrow28 Contributing Member

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    The complexity of adventure writing

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Scarecrow28, Aug 19, 2008.

    Ugg. :mad: I'm still working on my novel plot, although my train of creative thoughts has been slowed considerably by my self-doubt. :( When I started working on my novel, I had no idea just how complex an action/adventure (more broadly labeled "thriller") novel could truly be. It involves a lot of historical information that I must make sure is correct and somehow find a way to use this information as guiding clues of sorts for the main character. I've spent more time researching the specific time period of history it involves rather than actual writing. Its really starting to drive me to the brink of insanity, but it'll be worth it when I finish.
     
  2. Ungood
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    Ungood Contributing Member

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    Good to know!

    That is the spirit! :)
     
  3. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Scarecrow28,

    About an hour ago, I finished up the first draft to a mystery/suspense short story (about 4600 words). While it's not as complex as a novel, the process I went through for it (and a couple other shorts I wrote--as well as the novels I've completed and submitted) might be useful to you.

    I have a good idea what I want to write and what I think should happen. I have notes and thoughts jotted down, sometimes even bits of dialouge.

    Then I begin writing, knowing that as the story develops and takes form, there will be clues I'll have to go back and 'insert' or clarify, things I'll have to look up and verify, alter dialouge and maybe a location or two.

    For the short story I just finished, I wrote about 2/3s of it, then went back and fixed what I needed to, to complete the final scenes and so that everything was consistent and fit together.

    My point is, that while I believe in preparation, you can not adequately prepare all information, for every twist and turn in the plot, every bit of foreshadowing and red herring tossed in prior to actually writing.

    Just bookmark the weblinks that will be useful (or have the texts/periodicals handy on a shelf), and to go them as you need the information. Count on inspiration as you write to help guide the story in an interesting and exciting direction, knowing that you can gather the information you need to supplment what you already have.

    Just a thought or two. Keep up the good work!

    Terry
     
  4. Scarecrow28
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    Scarecrow28 Contributing Member

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    Thanks Terry :)
     

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