1. kisonakl
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    kisonakl Member

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    The Process of Editing

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by kisonakl, Jul 2, 2008.

    So, I'm creating this thread to gain some insight into the process of editing that goes on when a person is getting a book published (more specifically, a novel).

    How intensive is it? Does an editor look for continuity errors and typos, or does he have a large hand in changing around a lot of prose? Basically, how much of the original product can one expect to remain after the editing process is done?
     
  2. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    I'm sure you'll hear more from published writers here like mammamaia and Terry Erwin, but my understanding is that publishers can't be bothered with major edits to an authror's writing. It simply isn't cost effective.

    If the submitted novel isn't very nearly what they want as submitted, the only writing they will do is the rejection letter.

    I believe the title is the most likely item to undergo change. Publishers are marketing a product, and the title is a marketing element that can have one of the greatest impacts on sales.

    So that's a response from someone who has never submitted anything to a publisher (yet), but who has seen this question asked before in one form or another.
     
  3. kisonakl
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    kisonakl Member

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    Thank you much :)
     
  4. Lucy E.
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    Lucy E. Contributing Member

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    If you want a very thorough behind-the-scenes look at publishing and editing, but Laura Whitcomb (successful published author) and Ann Rittenberg's (top literary agent) book, Your First Novel. Laura's half of the book gives you great advice on writing, while Ann's half details the behind-the-scenes of agenting, editing, and publishing.
    Here's a link if you'd like to find out more and/or purchase the book: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1582973881/?tag=postedlinks04-20.
    I've found it to be a great help.
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    cog is basically right... and you certainly don't have to buy any books to get the info you need... there's all kinds of tips and basic info all over the net... not all of which is valid, so be sure to check the qualifications of the person offering it...

    as for your questions:

    depends on the publisher, but won't be very intensive, for a first time writer... as cog noted, your ms had better be as close to perfect as possible, before you submit it... best-selling established writers are often assigned an editor who works more closely with the author, but that doesn't happen with newbies as a rule... it wouldn't be cost effective, when they have no idea how well [or poorly] the book will sell...

    again, it depends on the publisher and the editor... some may be virgo-level nit-picky and others just catch the most glaring errors and let others slip by...

    unline screenwriting, it'll be close to 100% of what you submit that will appear in print... if they want anything significantly different from what you submitted, they'll require you to make the changes, not spend good money having their own editors do it...

    hope this helps...

    love and hugs, maia
     

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