1. Lightning
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    Lightning Member

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    Thinking too far ahead?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Lightning, Apr 23, 2012.

    Hello everyone!

    Again I ask for your help, and it with a simple sort of problem this time around. I was just wondering if I've thought too far ahead in my novel story.

    Basically I've sorted out the plot that will fit into 3-4 good sized books, but I also have a large untapped possibilities for after all of this that would equate to another 3-4 books. Am I thinking too far ahead with my story?

    Keep in mind that I do write regularly and it's of a high quality (say others), so it's not all planning, I just want to know if it's too much thought.

    Many thanks, Lightning
     
  2. naturemage
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    naturemage Active Member

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    You're going to hear from other members about publishing in such (I read a thread on new authors and publishing series, trust me, you'll hear it). However, I don't think you're getting too far ahead of yourself. As long as you are working on the first story first. I have several series in mind, and have the plots outlined. But just work on the first story, don't go writing bits and pieces of each one, otherwise you might think of something later on for the first, and then you'll have to go back to the others and change things.
     
  3. jazzabel
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    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

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    The only plots that fit into 3 really good books are so epic, incredible, only very accomplished writers manage to write such a tour de force. Think Tolkien. Do you really have material equivalent to the "LOTR" trilogy?
    If you are not an experienced, accomplished writer, you probably have decent plot for one good book plus a few stray ideas. I would recommend you focus on one book at the time, keeping in mind that books only tolerate relevant, concise writing rather than needless description, three-page dialogue which can be condensed into a paragraph, scenes which don't advance the plot etc.

    In my opinion, nobody comes up with plotlines for entire series. Series happens if the first book is interesting enough. It takes many years of work and inspiration to write quality series, so it's good to aim for it, but I would recommend you try to write a tight, interesting book with memorable characters and take it from there. Don't dilute the narrative for the sake of filling another book or two. Just my 2 cents.
     
  4. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    regardless of what you have planned, the first novel you submit to agents/publishers MUST be able to stand on its own and be marketable whether or not there will be sequels because, if it doesn't become a bestseller, no publisher will take on the sequels...
     
  5. AmyHolt
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    AmyHolt Contributing Member

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    I agree. Go ahead and dream. Experienced, accomplished writers have to come from somewhere. Just make sure you work on your story one book at a time.
     
  6. The Tourist
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    The Tourist Banned

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    If you can keep track of the continuity. Look at how many errors there are in Star Wars.

    I'm fixing stuff constantly.
     
  7. The Magnan
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    The Magnan Active Member

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    As long as you think carefully about the events, and try not to forget important facts then I see no problem in thinking ahead, I've spent a few years on a single novel (still haven't finished) and considering it will be my first, i want to get it just right. Just go for it.
     
  8. superpsycho
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    superpsycho Contributing Member

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    I really depends on you. If looking ahead affects or distracts from what you're working on, then it's a problem. Large goals are find unless you can't handle set backs. Figure out what you can deal with, then manage your expectations accordingly. Your primary focus is the quality and productivity of your work. If you can't get that right, the rest doesn't matter.
     
  9. MeganHeld
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    MeganHeld Senior Member

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    Go ahead and think as far ahead as you want. I would say do not plan too far ahead until after you finish the first book. The first book can change much of what you have planned. Plus, don't draw out the plot if you want it to last throughout a whole series. Just see where the writing takes you, especially after the first book. I wrote a first book wanting it not to be a series and it turned into one. So, anything is possible and I agree, be warned about the people not telling you to write a series.
     
  10. jwatson
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    jwatson Active Member

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    Yes, in my opinion you are planning too far ahead.

    But you do seem to feel that you are doing this planning justly.

    For me, I find that when I plan things out, even just plan something out for a book, by the time I finish it, I will have changed everything dozens of times that the original plan is nothing but a memory. I've never done so for numerous books at a time, but I can imagine the overwhelming content you will have to keep in mind of as you write. To be honest, when I read the title of the thread, I figured you had meant that you have planned ahead in a single book, not 3-4. I personally think it is a lot of planning.
     
  11. thecoopertempleclause
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    thecoopertempleclause Contributing Member

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    I too would say you go for one mega-epic novel, get that published. Don't even mention to a publisher in your query letter that you have a series in mind, if it sells well enough, they might be happy enough to deal with you on a second in a series. It is, however, absolutely imperative that you don't leave plot-strands hanging in your first novel, which is what a lot of people do when planning them as part of a series (I did it myself not so long ago, I had planned a rather good cliffhanger to finish the novel, but instead used that as a mid-point cliffhanger instead).
     
  12. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    good advice from thecoop...
     
  13. BytheNine
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    BytheNine New Member

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    I would definitely take thecoops advice, also as someone else said make sure the first novel can stand on it's own values.
    Make sure a publisher, and most importantly the reader feels satisfied with the books conclusion, but also leave them wanting more.
     

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