1. jps117
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    jps117 Member

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    U.s. / U.k.

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by jps117, Jun 1, 2008.

    Has anyone else here noticed that many young authors from the U.S. have their stories take place in the U.K., and that young authors in the U.K. do the opposite?

    P.S. I'm guilty of this. :redface:
     
  2. FantasyWitch
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    FantasyWitch Contributing Member

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    Nope :p

    I write my novels here at home. I wouldn't like writing for America because its a diffrent culture.
     
  3. Charisma
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    Charisma Transposon Contributor

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    Maybe it is so. It's human nature, to like and act like something they're not. I for instance, have my stories written in different places, but I am yet to write a story (except one, indirectly) which is set in my own country. However, I don't feel guilty because the purpose of my stories is to embrace all cultures, and my culture will come in soon enough. :p
     
  4. Lucy E.
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    Lucy E. Contributing Member

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    Most of my stories are set between the US and UK. Most of my friends are American, and I don't really see that much difference in the two places.
     
  5. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Just look at all the old-school Disney movies from the USA. The characters were always British or, if the real world nationality was dubious, they always had vaguely British accents. America and Britain have cultures which are similar enough to understand easily for younger people, but different enough to evince a sense of romanticism.

    Britain has a truly ancient history filled with possibilities for a young American writer.

    America has wide open spaces and unexplored corners enough to satisfy the imagination of any young woman putting pen to paper in London.

    It only seems natural to me that each side of the pond would romanticize the other.
    :p:rolleyes:
     
  6. jps117
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    jps117 Member

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    Well said, Wreybies.
     
  7. Lucy E.
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    Lucy E. Contributing Member

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    Americans usually only set their stories in England, though (especially London). London isn't half of what it's cracked up to be, I'm sorry to say.
     
  8. Kratos
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    Kratos Contributing Member

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    Well, most of my stories don't take place in real places -- they're all created by me. But they seem Medieval Englandish.

    If I did write a story that took place in the real world, I'd write it in America because I know more about it than England.
     
  9. Lucy E.
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    Lucy E. Contributing Member

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    What is people's deal with England? Holy cow, England, England, England...I'm sorry, but I just don't get that. What's so great about England? What happened to the rest of Britain?
     
  10. jps117
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    jps117 Member

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    Hmm, I dunno. You're the one that lives there!
     
  11. Banzai
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    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

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    It rains too much in Wales. And there are too many sheep :p

    People are scared away from Scotland by the Glaswegians.

    And Ireland is full of drunks :p


    Hope that answers your question in a very stereotyped and jestfully prejudiced way Lucy E. :p
     
  12. Lucy E.
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    Lucy E. Contributing Member

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    Quite.
    It's hotter here than in England, and it rarely rains where I live during summer. I hate sheep. There aren't many sheep here. Sheep this, sheep that...lol

    Glaswegians are very nice people.

    There aren't that many drunks in Ireland. I should know, half my family's Irish.


    Jack, how should I know what's so great about England? I've only been there twice.
     
  13. jps117
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    jps117 Member

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    I was keying in on 'the rest of Britain', but I see why you'd think otherwise. I should've been clearer.
     
  14. Lucy E.
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    Lucy E. Contributing Member

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    No worries. Lol :)
     
  15. Kratos
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    Kratos Contributing Member

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    A lot of Americans do this, but I'm not saying they should, but most Americans use UK and England interchangeably. Our knowledge about England is greater than our knowledge of Wales, Ireland, or Scotland.
     
  16. Banzai
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    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

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    I should point out that my previous post was intended as a joke...

    I should also point out that the English are just a bunch of moaners :p
     
  17. Daniel I Russell
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    Daniel I Russell Contributing Member

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    No.

    But on a slightly different note, I got into a bit of an argument with my editor over the whole US/UK thing. I am a British Writer and proud. All my novels are set in blighty, and I try for a very British feel. My ed wanted me to use terms like trunk, elevator, sidewalk, garbage, etc. I said no. I will use the terms we use here. It is a British novel. When she eventually agreed, I got my manuscript back after edits and whenever an example of these words came up, there was an editors comment:

    Insert footnote for American readers.

    I went nuts! I felt it was extremely insulting to American readers. I read american novels and have no problem with the language. I read and thoroughly enjoyed King's The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, and I know nothing about baseball! It won't happen again. I'm British. My characters are Chavs or old gentlemen who drink lots of tea, etc!
     
  18. Crazy Ivan
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    Crazy Ivan Contributing Member

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    I don't think I've ever actually set any of my stories in England. I'd worry too much about totally messing up a bunch of slang/daily life details, me being the perfect Americanus Ignoramus. (In the words of Eddie Izzard: "Do you get this? Do you know there are other countries?") However, almost all the entertainment I consume- books, film, music, and as the above quote demonstrated, humor- comes from the UK, and I honestly want nothing more than to live there for a nice long while.
    Alas.
     
  19. Marcelo
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    Marcelo Contributing Member

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    Hhmm... Well, for one thing I like seeing movies where the crew has a british accent. England is related with knights, castles, it has forests and all those things. Altough I have never been in Europe, I know most of its history, folklore, traditions and mythology, and I find it more entertaining than the many mythologies in Mexico (I mean, try spelling things like Chalchiuhtlatonal, but I still enjoy it). The continent of America is very different to Europe. The southern parts of America are more... Tropical. There are also many deserts. I particulary would like to visit Europe to see castles, forests, mountains and other sights.
     
  20. Marcelo
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    Marcelo Contributing Member

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    Also, another thing may be that VERY successful writers like J.K. Rowling, J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis lived there.
     
  21. Lucy E.
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    Lucy E. Contributing Member

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    For some reason no one recognises that some great British writers are from Scotland, Ireland and Wales also...this one idiot thought that S, I and W are states in England...how ignorant. Lol!

    And most of America's presidents have been either Welsh or of Welsh descent...
     
  22. Crazy Ivan
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    Crazy Ivan Contributing Member

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    I'm afraid they were only of Welsh descent, because you have to be born in America to actually, you know, be a president.
     
  23. Lucy E.
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    Lucy E. Contributing Member

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    Which annoys me. I don't see any difference whatsoever between any of the countries in Britain, besides the accent, so Americans have all the knowledge they need.
     
  24. Lucy E.
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    Lucy E. Contributing Member

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    Actually, one of your earliest presidents (I forget the name), though it's a little-known fact, was born in Wales, making him Welsh.
     
  25. Crazy Ivan
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    Crazy Ivan Contributing Member

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    So then, by your own argument, there's nothing to be annoyed about, right? Cuz, well, apparently we know all we need to know.

    (That was in response to post #23.)

    Also, cool, I never knew that! Now I need to look that up so I can annoy my friends with random knowledge...

    EDIT: Whoa, hey, Thomas Jefferson actually spoke Welsh. Niftay.
     

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