1. k.little90
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    k.little90 Active Member

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    Umm... Health Care Reform?

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by k.little90, Mar 22, 2010.

    I didn't really pay attention to all of the talk going on about health care reform because I assumed it wasn't gonna get anywhere (Bad decision on my part.) Now that it's passed the house I'm curious to know what it's all about. I googled it, but didn't really understand any of the crap that I got. Can anyone please explain it to me in Lamens terms? Good or bad?
     
  2. Banzai
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    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

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    Keep this thread civil. ​


    If it turns into a flame war, then it will be closed immediately, and those responsible will be infracted.

    You have been warned.
     
  3. Gigi_GNR
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    Gigi_GNR Guys, come on. WAFFLE-O. Contributor

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    Basically over the next few years, insurance coverage for every American will be mandatory. Pre-existing conditions are going to be covered, and lower prescription costs and help for the elderly, as well as medical malpractice reform, to name a few things the bill will be doing. However, there's quite a hefty cost that comes along with all this, as you can imagine. There are several pros and cons, but I just named a few......
     
  4. Gallowglass
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    Gallowglass Contributing Member Contributor

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    Essentially, Obama has opted for the middle ground between the British completely free healthcare system and the American completely paid-for and class-segregated system. It extends coverage to thirty-two million more Americans, and the system is organised by the government. It is expensive - three trillion dollars, apparently. But as it will raise American life expectancy by two or three years, if other countries are good models to go by, then it's worth it, in my opinion.
     
  5. LordKyleOfEarth
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    LordKyleOfEarth Contributing Member Contributor

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    Any measure that allows people (albeit, dirty worthless poor people) to live longer and have the option to see a doctor is good in my book.

    Never again will I (or anyone else) have to buy blackmarket antibiotics because they have strep-throat but not $125 for a doctor's visit.

    Never again will anyone have to not go get that strange lump checked out because they cannot afford chemo anyway.

    Its awesome.

    There are also reforms to the FAFSA system (gov issues all loans now, so they are more stable for students, and the interest payments go to fund the healthcare system)
     
  6. Speedy
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    Speedy Contributing Member Contributor

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    Better health = Win.


    Three trillion dollars you say. That's quiet some expense.

    Worth it :D
     
  7. Azhigher
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    Azhigher Senior Member

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    It may not be the perfect end all solution, but if nothing else it's a step in the right direction IMO.
     
  8. hiddennovelist
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    hiddennovelist Contributing Member Contributor

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    Agreed. For the people who oppose it, I can understand being nervous about it, especially since it's something we Americans have no real experience with, so it's new and unfamiliar and scary...but honestly, coming from the position of someone who has gone without health care and really needed it, change is definitely needed. No one should have to put off getting needed medical testing or treatment because they can't afford it and don't have medical coverage...and getting independent coverage if you don't have a job that provides it isn't always an option.
     
  9. pinelopikappa
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    pinelopikappa Senior Member

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    It's a great thing, and although things will not become ideal, they will certainly become better. I haven't read all the details, but we've had a similar system for years and years and it has served people. Tourists as well, if you must know, involved in accidents etc. We are moving to he opposite direction lately (unfortunately), so be happy this is happenning. I mean, if the only problem is the high cost, what's more important than the health of a country's people? Health and education I believe. Don't be nervous about it, it'll be ok.
     
  10. SonnehLee
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    SonnehLee Contributing Member Contributor

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    Okay. I come from an extremely republican family, so everyone in my family is all "BOO! HISS!! SOCIALISM!!" But I have read enough from the democrat side that I kinda see both arguments.

    I have questions. If this healthcare reform (which, as far as I've seen, really only majorly changes insurance companies) goes into effect, who gets affected by it?

    What were the initial problems with the healthcare/insurance industry?

    Aren't there better ways to solve the initial problems than completely overhauling the existing system?


    I have no idea what the answers are. Someone who's smarter than me needs to answer them.
     
  11. MCWhite
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    MCWhite Contributing Member

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  12. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    I'm with you, MC. However, I don't want this thread to get out of hand. This is not the place to debate the politics.

    There are plenty of other forums where the debates can rage on unchecked. :)
     
  13. jonathan hernandez13
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    jonathan hernandez13 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I had to edit my comment because it would have gotten me in trouble

    I will only say this...the original helath bill was made to serve as a public alternative to the private type


    it would have given competition to the only game in town, essentially a monopoly


    and now they are complaining about competition, it's pretty obvious to me why the wealthy are against a public option
     
  14. MCWhite
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    MCWhite Contributing Member

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    Understood. :)
     
  15. Gigi_GNR
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    Gigi_GNR Guys, come on. WAFFLE-O. Contributor

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    I completely and totally echo MC's thoughts here. The central idea is to lower the cost of healthcare, and I'm pretty sure all Americans can agree that there are resources enough for everyone to get fair treatment, and that they should be treated, not turned away or charged what they can't pay. IMO, (and this may not count for much, because I am after all only 15.....but I can see it from a schoolkid's perspective, and maybe that makes all the difference, I don't know) healthcare has gotten way too expensive and overcomplicated. It's treating sick people, something decent human beings do every day without getting paid. Why are there so many people trying to squeeze money out of others? It makes me sad. :(


    All that aside, I say it would be great to just have universal healthcare. To walk in and get treated, no complicated money worries, that would be nice. :)

    And emily, I definitely have asked that question before. Aren't there better ways than a complete overhaul?

    There probably are, but the idea was that we needed change NOW, not baby steps over the next few years. In that aspect, instantaneous gratification is something that we should have, and I don't want to wait years and years until I'm eligible for this or don't have to worry about that anymore.

    That being said, a nearly $1 trillion overhaul is not the way to go, either. I would prefer medium steps, doing as much as possible and yet being cost-effective. The last thing we need is more debt to pile on that $12 trillion sinkhole. :rolleyes:


    Another thing I've thought, and I'm not trying to offend anybody, because I'm honestly curious: Republicans (and some Democrats too, I'm sure) say they don't want socialized health care (like emily said), but we already have Medicare and Medicaid, socialized healthcare programs. In essence, we already have socialized health care, don't we?
     
  16. MCWhite
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    MCWhite Contributing Member

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    That makes it sound free. But you, along with all taxpaying Americans, will carry the weight of universal healthcare, and this will be reflected in your paycheck (I'm not sure if the insurance 'fee' will be taken out of our checks as Social Security and Medicare are, or if we'll pay separately - it sounds like the latter). Funding for government programs comes from one source - the people. Only those exempted because of low income will be free from the fee. The rest of us will carry the weight of this bill on our own backs, whether we want to or not (there's a penalty if you don't buy insurance).
    But this isn't instant gratification. From what I've read, most major changes won't go into effect until 2014. Immediately (as in, as soon as the legislation becomes law), I believe the most major change is in regards to those w/ pre-existing conditions - they won't be denied coverage.

    Sidenote (I hope this is in bounds): Obama's mantra was "change now," but at what cost? Regardless of your stance on the bill, it's clear relations in Washington and across the nation are more strained than ever, largely because of the way in which this bill was forced through the House and Senate with little bipartisan cooperation. There's a chasm between Republicans and Democrats as a result. It's upsetting, because I was hoping the opposite would happen - that we'd work together, mutually compromising, for a solution.
     
  17. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    There is also the matter of the additional costs that will fall on the shoulders of employers. Some employers will no longer be able to stay in business, and others may have to reduce staff. That equates to fewer jobs.

    No one is saying health care reform isn't necessary. The debate is over what form it takes, and how the current version was made into law. Will the benefits outweigh the costs?

    Time will tell.

    The issue is a very heated one here in the United States. We don't need to bring that heat here. Therefore, if I see any escalation of the debate here, I won't hesitate to close the thread.
     
  18. Link the Writer
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    Link the Writer Flipping Out For A Good Story. Contributor

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    I hope I don't make it closed if I say that I agree with Cogito. Only time will tell.

    Not sure how to say anything else without bringing the heated debate in...
     
  19. jonathan hernandez13
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    jonathan hernandez13 Contributing Member Contributor

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    does anyone have any details or figures?

    I saw the Obama speech on youtube but he only gave us a watered down version of the bill and wrapped it up with doublespeak and legal lingo

    anyone have a distilled version ith just the facts?:confused:
     
  20. Link the Writer
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    Link the Writer Flipping Out For A Good Story. Contributor

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    I would like to know too. It was just too complicated for me to follow. :0
     
  21. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    How's this: It's 1017 pages long. That should tell you something.
     
  22. Link the Writer
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    Link the Writer Flipping Out For A Good Story. Contributor

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    Wow, that's a lot of pages. o____O Who's gonna read that much? They couldn't have made a cliffnotes version of it? XD
     
  23. jonathan hernandez13
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    jonathan hernandez13 Contributing Member Contributor

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    *glares at Cog*

    yes, that tells me something, but not anything that we can use:mad:
     
  24. MCWhite
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    MCWhite Contributing Member

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    The legislation passed is also not just about health care - there are provisions within it (some of them still being tweaked) to tax indoor tanning beds by 10%, to put calorie counters on fast food items, to place a cap on flexible spending accounts (I think it's $2,500?), and putting the federal government in charge of all student loans (banks are set to lose a buck or two on the last one).

    Trying to muddle through all the information without getting sideswiped by partisan opinions is pretty tough.
     
  25. Link the Writer
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    Link the Writer Flipping Out For A Good Story. Contributor

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    @ Jon= Well, we have to play it safe. Cogito made it clear that if this escalates to a huge fight, he's gonna lock it.

    From what I understand, according to President Obama himself, there are two things that were included:

    --> You can keep the doctor you choose.

    --> Insurance companies will not penalize you for pre-existing conditions.
     

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