1. stonecold
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    stonecold Member

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    Verb (used without object)

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by stonecold, Apr 18, 2009.

    I looked up a few words to understand how to use them and why certain word you have to add the "ed" to make sense.

    -Died
    -Arrived

    What do they mean by using without object?
     
  2. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    There are two kinds of verbs, transitive verbs, and intransitive verbs. Transitive verbs take a direct object, representing what the action of the verb acts upon. Intransitive verbs do not take a direct object.

    Examples of transitive verbs:

    see (I see the stranger - the stranger is the direct object The sentence makes no sense without a direct object,)
    hit (John hit me)
    found (Jason found the fleece)

    Examples of intransitive verbs:

    arrived (I arrived - no direct object, none would make any sense)
    sle
    speak (we speak)

    As for your -ed endings, they are the most common way to change the present tense of a verb to the past tense. It doesn't change whether the verb is transitive or intransitive,

    In the dictionary, a transitive verb is labeled as v.t., and an intransitve verb is labeled as v.i.
     
  3. stonecold
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    stonecold Member

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    Thankz, that will help me with my writing. I wonder why I was never taught about transitive and intrasitive verbs in school.

    I got another question.

    Stand vs stood

    Stood can also be used as past tense.

    If I'm asking a teacher what an acronym stands for, what is the grammatically way of saying that?

    Professor, will you repeat what_____ stands for? or
    Professor, will you repeat what ____ stood for?

    IMO, using "stood for" is the correct way because there is no object at the end. Is that correct?

    +

    When I grew up? vs when I grow up?

    Is "grew up" the correct way of saying this because there is no object after?
     
  4. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Again, whether a verb is transitive or intransitive (takes or doesn't take an object) is completely separate from verb tense.

    Stand/stand is present tense: I stand, you stand, he stands, we stand, they stand.
    Stood is past tense: I stood, you stood, he stood, we stood, they stood.

    There are many tenses, in many cases including auxilliary verbs. For instance,
    Will stand is future tense: I will stand, you will stand, he will stand, we will stand, they will stand.

    Note that none of these take a direct object. The verb stand is intransitive in all its tenses.

    Complicating matters further, there are many verbs which have transitive and intransitive meanings among multiple definitions.

    For example the verb run:
    I run daily - intransitive. There is no direct object here, run means to move more quickly than walking speed, and daily is an adverb.
    I run programs - transitive. In this instance, run means operate, and programs are what the subject (I) is operating (the direct object).
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    in the first 2 examples, there is another determining factor... time:

    ...this is correct if you're asking about what it stands for in a particular 'now' instance, such as in a comment the teacher made on your paper...

    ...while this would be correct if you're asking what "NRA" stood for in the New Deal years [Nat'l Recovery Act], vs what it stands for nowadays [Nat'l Rifle Assoc.]... and yes, you need that 'for' after 'stands/stood' when the verb is used in that context...

    it depends on the context, as well as time frame... such as:

    which can be done this way, as well:

    and

    which can also be:

    the bottom line?... in creative writing, there is never just one way to word something, regardless of what rule of grammar applies here or there...hope this helps...

    love and hugs, maia
     
  6. stonecold
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    stonecold Member

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    Wow, I learned alot.
     

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